YLC Member of the Month: Andrea Marquez

When Texans Standing Tall brags about how wonderful our Youth Leadership Council members are, it’s always genuine!

Andrea, 16

To kick off 2017, we are recognizing Andrea Marquez as January’s YLC member of the month. Andrea was selected out of hundreds of applicants across the country to join Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America’s (CADCA) National Youth Leadership Initiative (NYLI). She is currently in the Train the Trainer program, a program that prepares the next generation of leaders to empower other young people to take action around drug use prevention.

“When I went to the Mid-Year Training Conference, I became aware of the problems communities throughout the United States face, and I realized I wanted to do something about it. I saw the impact youth had in their own communities and I was compelled to have the same kind of impact. I noticed how dedicated the NYLI members were and I decided to apply,” Andrea said.

The Train the Trainer program consists of five phases. Andrea completed the second phase of the training on January 16, which required her to travel to Arlington, Virginia. In phases three, four and five, she will go to the CADCA National Leadership Forum and Mid-Year Training as a “trainer in training” where a trainer will guide her through the conferences, The fourth phase will be participating in conference and video calls, and in the fifth phase she will graduate. Once she graduates, she will officially be a CADCA NYLI  Trainer.

“I hope to gain more knowledge and awareness about drug-use in different communities throughout the United States. I also hope to obtain more information about the effects drugs have on communities,” Andrea said.

Andrea attended CADCA’s Mid-Year Training in July 2016 as part of Texans Standing Tall’s Youth Leadership Council. After seeing the NYLI members in action, Andrea was inspired to expand her statewide leadership role to a national one by getting involved in the program.

“I met many members of the NYLI and I saw how passionate they were about the things they were doing. I realized that I was passionate about these issues too,” she said.

Andrea hopes to use the leadership skills she develops to make an impact in the lives of the less privileged in this world. She recognizes how discrimination and a lack of care can affect the distribution of alcohol and the level of damage it does to communities.

“I hope to become a voice for those without one, and I aspire to end the inequality so many people face. I want to become an advocate and stand up for the little guy, the minority. Joining the National Youth Leadership Initiative will help me better understand why drug-abuse is a problem throughout the nation, and I hope that this knowledge will help me reach my goals,” she said.

 

 

 

Prevent Risky Behavior This Holiday Season

As finals put a bow on the fall semester, high school and college students are beginning to make plans to get together for parties or reunions as friends gather back home. With time on their hands and a festive season, there are many opportunities for the dangers of alcohol use to jingle all the way into their young lives. Along with the holiday gatherings comes the frightful increase of alcohol-fueled risky behavior like unwanted or unplanned sex, fights including alcohol-related car crashes. With the semester ending, now is an extremely important time to discuss the dangers of drinking and driving with the youth in your life.

Many parents believe allowing their children and their children’s friends to consume alcohol under their roof encourages healthier attitudes toward alcohol, but in truth, alcohol consumption by underage youth increases the risks of unwanted or unplanned sex, fights, homicides, and suicides. Parents also believe that taking the keys away from youth will prevent them from drinking and driving, but they may not be aware that youth are more likely to binge drink outside of the home when parents allow alcohol consumption in the home. Per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), drivers ages 16-20 are 17 times more likely to die in a car crash when they have a high blood alcohol concentration compared to when they have not been drinking. The CDC also reports that the chances for alcohol abuse increases when people begin drinking in their teenage years and The National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse reports that 90 percent of addictions begin in the teenage years.

Modeling good decision-making with alcohol is an effective approach to preventing your teens from making risky choices. Parents should also consider a “rules of the road” contract with their youth. Studies show that the children of parents who establish and enforce rules around alcohol make positive decisions when it comes to drinking and driving.

A good way to lead any conversation with youth is to remind them of the Zero Tolerance Laws in Texas, which makes it illegal to consume alcohol under the age of 21. It does not matter if the substance is provided by a friend’s parent, it is still illegal in the state of Texas.

Texans Standing Tall is a resource for coalitions and communities across the state working to address youth social access to alcohol. A long-term, community-based solution that TST educates about and promotes is a strategy called a civil social host ordinance. A civil social host ordinance is a city ordinance that holds people accountable for providing the location for underage drinking parties. Our partners at Circles of San Antonio are working toward a healthier and safer community through a social host ordinance. The city of El Paso recently passed such an ordinance. We are hoping to see many more around our state.

If you are interested in learning more about how a civil social host ordinance works:

  • visit our website
  • contact TST’s Strategy Specialist Brian Lemons
  • contact Community Mobilization Coordinator Libby Banks.