Reflections from AP18

 

In April,  several Texans Standing Tall staff members attended the 2018 Alcohol Policy Conference (AP18) in Arlington, VA.

The conference is convened by the U.S. Alcohol Policy Alliance and brings together professionals in support of effective alcohol policy research and practice to tackle the enormous alcohol-related harm affecting our communities on a global scale. Texans Standing Tall is proud to have participated in the event by serving on the planning committee and as a sponsor, providing staff volunteers, and presenting during several sessions over the course of the week. (Scroll down for photos!)

We could write a novel filled with all of the great information discussed and disseminated at AP18, but some of the major highlights from the week include:

  • Multiple sessions with updated information on the link between alcohol and cancer, where we learned more about national and international efforts to educate the public on the issue. Currently, in the U.S., there is lack of public awareness regarding the connection between the two – only 30% of Americans identify alcohol as a risk factor for cancer. Moving forward, it will be critically important for prevention advocates to inform the public of the increased risk and address claims about the positive health benefits of alcohol consumption.
  • Ongoing conversations about the ways in which alcohol advertising influences youth alcohol use. In addition to studies examining the marketing practices the alcohol industry employs to target young people, we also learned about new tools like the Alcohol Marketing Assessment Rating Tool (AMART) that researchers have developed to quickly asses how well the alcohol industry is actually sticking to their self-regulated marketing codes. As advocates, we must continue to vigilantly monitor the alcohol industry’s advertising practices and hold them accountable when they market adult products to our youth.
  • A presentation on the CDC’s new guide to help measure and regulate alcohol outlet density to prevent excessive drinking and improve public health. We also heard about a new study from the Prevention Research Center of PIRE that explores the relationship between community problems and outlets that sell alcohol for off-premise consumption. It became even more clear that communities must work to identify and collect data (like place of last drink and crime levels near outlets) that help illustrate the issues associated with the number of outlets in a given area.
  • Learning inspiring lessons from advocates who worked tirelessly to get alcohol sales shut down in Whiteclay, Nebraska– an unincorporated town with less than 12 residents, but four beers stores that supplied more than 3.5 million cans of beer annually to residents of the nearby Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. For years, the community fought to close the stores, all the while experiencing high addiction rates and a number of devastating health outcomes like infant mortality, teen suicide, and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Finally, on April 30, 2017, the Nebraska Liquor Control Commission’s decision to deny the stores’ re-licensure applications went into effect. The story of Whiteclay is a good reminder that the road to victory can be long and challenging, but the power and persistence of people’s voices is undeniable.

The gathering of so many individuals committed to translating sound public policy into public health practice was inspiring. Texans Standing Tall staff members returned from AP18 with a renewed commitment to our prevention work across the state.

Here are just a few of the things staff had to say about their time at AP18:

“To be surrounded by such passionate individuals who share a common vision of a world free from alcohol-related death, disease, and injury – there is nothing else like it. It was an honor to attend a conference where so many of the people whose work I have been reading and learning about for years were in attendance. I’m grateful for their dedication and the positive impact they have on the world.” — Sachin Kamble, Peer Policy Fellow

“It was fascinating to see and hear from prevention super stars at AP18.  It was a passionate group of professionals coming together to inspire and strategize on how to shape alcohol policy.  I was proud to be a part of it.” — Tammy Peck, Higher Education Prevention Specialist

“I had the opportunity to attend the Advocacy Institute, which was conducted in conjunction with AP18. During one session, a nonprofit attorney, provided information about how nonprofits can work on public policy issues without threatening their tax exemption status. There was so much important information for those of us working in the public policy realm. I’m excited to put this information into action as we begin to tackle marijuana legalization efforts in Texas.” — Kaleigh Becker, Program and Research Specialist

 “Attending AP18 was a great opportunity to learn from leading experts in the field of alcohol prevention who were sharing new data that empowers individuals and coalitions to be the champions for change in their own communities across the world.” — Anne-Shirley Schreiner, Strategy Specialist

The AP conference truly is a great way to learn more about the latest data and most pressing issues related to alcohol research and policy in the United States and around the world. To learn more about it, visit alcoholpolicyconference.org and set your calendars for the next one in April 2020!

TST staff headed to AP18
Bright-eyed and bushy-tailed TST staff ready for a full day of learning
Kaleigh Becker, TST’s Research & Program Specialist, sharing information about the Coalitions Project during her poster session
Tammy Peck, TST’s Higher Education Prevention Specialist, during her poster session on Screening & Brief Intervention
TST CEO Nicole Holt giving a presentation on Social Ordinances in Texas
YLC Co-Chair Katy Turner answering an audience question during a presentation about youth engagement with fellow YLC Co-Chair Andrea Marquez and TST’s Georgianne Crowell and Atalie Nitibhon
TST staff exploring the nation’s capital