“Drinksgiving”

 

While Thanksgiving traditionally conjures images of turkey, football, and family, Thanksgiving Eve is giving way to a relatively new phenomenon known as “Drinksgiving.”

Also referred to as “Black Out Wednesday,” Thanksgiving Eve has become the busiest night of the year for bars. Largely driven by a rush of college students and young adults who flock home for the Thursday holiday, people will often arrive the day before and head to their local hometown bar to meet up with old friends. According to a bartender interviewed about one of the year’s “booziest” days, “People always talk about New Year’s Eve. It isn’t that big compared to that Wednesday [before Thanksgiving].”

This cultural phenomena has become so popular that it prompted the NHTSA to build a powerful campaign around it last year called “Make It to the Table: Don’t Drink and Drive this Thanksgiving Eve.”

Because Thanksgiving is the most traveled-for holiday of the year, with many families traveling more than 50 miles during the long weekend, we’re talking about countless Texans on the roads this season.

According to some sobering statistics from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, alcohol-related crashes increase during the holidays, with alcohol-related fatalities spiking two to three times during that time as well. While the most dangerous holiday fluctuates, Thanksgiving is consistently one of the top three. From 2012 to 2016, over 800 people died in alcohol-impaired-driving crashes during the Thanksgiving holiday period.

At Texans Standing Tall, we know that awareness and preparedness can save lives. In our efforts to build healthier and safer communities for all, we’ll be sharing important tips on social media in the days before Thanksgiving Eve. Please “like” us on Facebook and join us this season by sharing our posts or creating your own. You can play an important role in keeping your loved ones safe and at your table this Thanksgiving.

Source: NHTSA Media

Texas Cancer Plan: Evidence-Based Policies Can Reduce Alcohol Consumption and Cancer Risk

In our most recent post, we recognized Breast Cancer Awareness Month by exploring the link between alcohol and breast cancer.

But breast cancer is just one of several types of cancer associated with alcohol consumption – head and neck, esophageal cancer, liver cancer, and colorectal cancer are among the others. And the link between alcohol and these types of cancer is not hypothetical, anecdotal, or mythical; there is strong scientific consensus since “clear patterns have emerged between alcohol consumption and the development of some cancers.”

Increasing public awareness and education about this connection can be challenging for those of us working in the field of prevention. Which is why we are inspired by a new development.

Last month, the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas released their 2018 Texas Cancer Plan. The plan includes 16 goals defined as “broad and lofty” statements that will help guide the state’s action plan for cancer research, prevention, and control.

At Texans Standing Tall, we took special note of Goal #2, which focuses on increasing healthy behaviors to reduce new cases and deaths from cancer. In particular, we were pleased to see that the plan instructs Texans to “support evidence-based policies to address excessive consumption of alcohol, including limits on days of sale, hours of sale, increasing alcohol taxes and regulating alcohol outlet density.”

What is so promising to those of us at TST and our partners across the state is that the language we use every single day in our work – terms like “evidence-based policies” and “alcohol outlet density” – are being articulated in an important report like the Texas Cancer Plan.

These are not simply industry buzz words, and the Texas Cancer Plan is absolutely on target: the strategies they list are proven ways to reduce underage and excessive alcohol use – and the associated cancer risk that comes along with it. They are also critical strategies in achieving a greater mission to create healthier, safer communities; a mission that becomes more possible as these terms become part of our public discourse and policy discussions.

According to the plan, it’s estimated that 44,713 Texans will lose their lives to cancer. Yet nearly 50 percent of new cancers and death from cancers can be prevented if we take the recommended steps to reduce certain risk factors. For example, increasing the alcohol excise tax by a dime a drink would mean at least 77 fewer Texans would die from cancer every year. In addition to saving individual lives, it also means that 77 fewer families would suffer from the devastating loss of a loved one. (See chart below for estimated annual reductions in cancer mortality.)

Statewide policies that reduce access to alcohol and other cancer-causing drugs, like tobacco, will literally save lives in the long run. As the Texas Legislature prepares for its next session in January, consider joining Texans Standing Tall or your local coalition to get involved in the conversation and play a role in preventing cancer deaths.

Source: “Alcohol Attributable Cancer Deaths” addendum from The Effects of Alcohol Excise Tax Increases on Public Health and Safety in Texas

 

 

 

 

Back-to-School Checklist: Middle and High School Edition

 

It’s mid-August and chances are, you’ve checked most of the back-to-school items off your list: school supplies, haircuts, new shoes, text books. You want your kids to be prepared, and you’re willing to navigate long lines and late nights to make sure they’re all set.

But are your kids just as prepared for the changes and peer pressure that come with each new year of middle and high school? Do they know where they’ll face the biggest pressure and how they’ll handle it? As a parent, even if you’re armed with information, how do you make sure your kids will listen?

The average age youth in Texas report drinking their first alcoholic beverage is 12.6, which is also the average age of a seventh grader. But in all likelihood, your child isn’t getting their alcohol at late-night raves or bars or dance clubs. The majority of middle and high schoolers get alcohol at home, from friends, or at parties.

For middle schoolers, this usually means drinking with 3-4 friends in their own home or at a friend’s house. For high school students, most drinking happens at house parties, which are often in the homes of friends or family. The parties usually take place when adults are away or simply unaware drinking is taking place under their roof. In other cases, parents are home and aware there is underage drinking occurring; they might even be supplying the alcohol.

As your kids continue to grow and encounter new experiences when they’re not under your watchful eye, how do you help keep them safe without locking them up until they’re 21?

Research says that if your message – don’t drink until you’re 21 – is clear, your child is less likely to drink than if you communicate a message that says, “I know you’re going to drink no matter what I say, so just be safe.”

Talking with your kids about alcohol isn’t an easy task, but there are some great resources available to help you have those conversations. We love these suggestions from Dr. Laura Markham over at Aha! Parenting. On her list of 15 suggestions for talking to your child about alcohol, she suggests parents try to “coach instead of control” and practice role-playing scenarios with their child.

Coach Instead of Trying to Control

You can’t actually control your child when she’s out of your sight. But you can help her become a person who has good values and good judgment. You do that by modeling and by talking. Ask questions to help your child reflect on what’s important to her and who she wants to be. Then listen hard. You’ll learn a lot from her answers.

  • Why do you think it’s illegal for kids and teens to drink alcohol?
  • What would you do if you were in a car and the driver had been drinking?
  • What about if the driver was a grown-up, like the parent of a friend?
  • Do you know any adults who drink too much? What do you think of them?
  • Have you ever thought that I drank too much? Acted differently when I drank alcohol?
  • Do you know any kids who have tried alcohol or drugs? Do you think that’s a problem?
  • Why do you think kids try alcohol?
  • When do you think kids are ready to try alcohol?
  • What do the kids at your school do at parties? Have you been to a party like that?
  • Have you ever been offered a drink? How did you handle it? Were you tempted? Why or why not?
  • What could you say if you were offered a drink and you didn’t want to look foolish?
  • What could you do at a party if you were feeling a little nervous, besides drinking?
  • What would you do if you were at a party and someone passed out from drinking alcohol?
  • Would you be worried about becoming addicted to alcohol or drugs? Why or why not? 

Have Practice Conversations with Your Child

Talk with him about the various scenarios he might encounter and the decisions he might have to make. What might he do or say? For instance, if someone offers him a drink:

  • No, thanks, I’m the designated driver.
  • No, thanks, I want to keep a clear head tonight.
  • No, thanks, I don’t drink.
  • No, thanks, my playing on the team is too important to me.
  • No, thanks, I’m allergic to alcohol.
  • No thanks, I love my cokes plain.
  • No, thanks. My parents would ground me forever if they found out — and they always do!

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) also has a lot of resources to help parents talk to their kids about alcohol.  Along with SAMHSA, we encourage you to “Talk. They Hear You.”  This summer, set aside some time before classes get started to talk with your kids about alcohol, peer pressure, and the decisions they may face in the new school year. They may not want to open up at first (and you may feel nervous asking questions, but don’t let that stop you!), but once they do and these conversations take place, they’re more likely to make choices that keep them healthy and safe.

To help get you started on these conversations, we’ve created a checklist of talking points below. If you have any other advice for talking to your kids about alcohol, be sure to share your tips with us in the comments!

Drinking to Cope with Parenthood Has Reached “Meme” Status

We’ve recently noticed – and perhaps you have too – a lot of internet memes, Instagram photos, ads, merchandise, and even events that make light of drinking to deal with the challenges of parenthood. At first, we didn’t think too much of it and maybe even gave some of the jokes a little chuckle. But once we started paying attention, we really started noticing it, and it became more and more troubling. What message are we sending our kids? That they’re so bad they drive us to drink? Or that drinking is the best way to cope with stress? Take a look for yourself:


Despite mountains of research telling us drinking alcohol is not the best way to deal with stress, we continue to see a growing collection of these types of things. It made us wonder – when did the alcohol industry decide parents were the ideal target?

From sponsoring wine and beer events for moms and dads to advertising gifts on Mother’s Day and Father’s Day, we’re shifting the cultural norms to something that ultimately, is not healthy for our children.

But, the more we see the social media posts, ads, t-shirts, mugs, and on and on and on, the more normal it becomes. Not only do we believe that “everyone else is drinking,” we believe it’s warranted. However, for every pretty photo of a happy hour cocktail shared on Instagram, there’s a real-life consequence to our parent drinking culture: our kids are watching, and we’re normalizing alcohol use for them, too.

We’ve shifted our cultural norms so that our kids see us treating alcohol like it’s any ol’ drink – soda, juice, coffee, tea. But it’s not. At its core, alcohol is a drug that can have severely negative consequences – especially when young people use it.

So, we don’t want to just brush this culture shift off. We want to join others in calling it out for what it is: exploitative marketing capitalizing on the difficulties of parenting.

We’re not saying parents should never relax and unwind with a glass of wine or a cold one here and there. But the fact of the matter is, parents have a huge influence over their children’s future drinking habits.

Case in point, this internet post of a child’s response to a school assignment asking them to write one sentence about a family member and draw a picture:

More often than not, our children will adopt the behaviors we model for them. If we tell our kids not to drink to fit in or deal with difficulties, but they then see us drinking to “cope with the stresses of parenting,” what message are we giving them, and what behavior are they going to copy?

Parenting is hard. It’s one of the toughest jobs in the world, and it can seem flat out overwhelming at times. Building connections and getting support from others is an important and meaningful way to strengthen our villages so we can keep our kids healthy and safe.

At the same time, it’s important for us to pay more attention to the messaging we’re being fed when it comes to parental drinking behaviors – it’s a kind of manipulation that is so pervasive, we may not even recognize it as marketing. However, being aware of it and knowing that our behavior influences the future behavior of our children might encourage more of us to scroll past that “mommy juice” meme on Facebook without giving it a “like.”

What kind of messages about parental drinking have you all seen circulating lately? Are they more pervasive with the rise of social media? What concerns do you have about this type of consumer marketing strategy? We’d love to hear from you in the comments below!

 

TST Working with Coalitions Across Texas

 

Summer may be a time for slowing down, but Texans Standing Tall is ramping up our work with coalitions across the state this season.

Whether we’re traveling to the Rio Grande Valley for media training or headed to Tyler for stakeholder meetings, we’re focused on reaching prevention groups and helping them achieve their missions by working together with advocates, activists, and local leaders.

In May, TST’s Research & Program Specialist Kaleigh Becker traveled to Corpus Christi and the Rio Grande Valley to meet with safety experts, lead a focus group, and collaborate with various coalitions on strategies to reduce impaired driving and underage alcohol use. Attendees also received an in-person demo of our online searchable coalitions tool, which helps individuals and organizations connect to leverage resources and enhance prevention efforts. Additionally, Strategy Specialist Anne-Shirley Schreiner and Director of Community Outreach & Education Georgianne Crowell hit the road to train local advocates, law enforcement, and youth on media and community engagement. The trainings helped the coalitions grow their efforts to address underage alcohol use in their communities.

This June, the road trips continue as we visit multiple cities – including Fort Worth, Tyler, and Waxahachie – to meet with transportation safety experts, state agencies, and university advocates on effective strategies for reducing alcohol use and impaired driving among youth. We’ll also spend some time in Hood County, training youth and adults on how to partner to create positive community change.

In July, we’ll head to to Blanco County to train coalition members on strategies for preventing youth substance use, then help them build a roadmap to success for doing just that. Later on this summer, we’ll make our way to East Texas for a controlled party dispersal training, where we’ll train local law enforcement on ways to safely and effectively break up underage drinking parties.

If you live in one of the communities mentioned above and would like to learn more about what we’ll be doing and how you can get involved when we visit your area, be sure to let us know!

Through training, education, and collaboration, we hope to significantly reduce the incidences of underage drinking – and the consequences that go along with it – in our communities. We know we are most effective when we can directly engage with local leaders and advocates who are passionate and mission-driven.

As we meet with and train coalitions throughout the state, we’re encouraged to learn that communities are excited to have additional opportunities for education and collaboration.

We know the best way to build healthier and safer communities is by exploring ways we can work hand-in-hand with groups that are committed to raising awareness, advocating for substance use prevention, and building a Texas in which alcohol, tobacco, and other drug use have no place in the lives of youth.

Are you involved in your local prevention coalition? Are you interested in learning more about working with us directly? If so, please reach out to Georgianne Crowell at gcrowell@texansstandingtall.org or 512- 442-7501. We’d love to work with you!

Coalition members in Pharr getting interviewed for the local news:

Training youth and law enforcement in Pharr:

Talks and Activities Can Help Prevent Summertime Underage Drinking

 

Your kids are out of school for the summer – but from 9 to 5, you’re still at the office.

How are your teenagers spending the dog days of summer? Are you involved in their day-to-day activities? Do you know where they’ll be, who they will be with, and what they’ll be doing? If they are hanging out at home and/or spending their time with friends, do you know their parents, and have you talked to them about underage drinking?

Though these conversations are important year-round, they’re especially critical in the summer time, when kids are also far more likely to have their first drink. After all, on an average day in June or July, more than 11,000 kids will start drinking. By comparison, that number averages 5,000 to 8,000 during the rest of the year.

If your child isn’t taking summer school, working a summer job, or otherwise occupied in the months ahead, they may find themselves with time on their hands – the kind of leisure that can lead to boredom and experimentation.

Your high schoolers, who may be spending their days hanging out at the lake, going to festivals, or attending parties – where kids overwhelming get their access to alcohol– need to know you don’t approve of them drinking alcohol. If they’re spending time at friends’ houses, where older siblings or adults might be willing to supply alcohol, your children are more likely to say no if you’ve clearly communicated that you don’t approve of underage drinking. It’s also important to talk to the parents of the peers your children are hanging out with about your expectations. But even when kids don’t drink, too often they get into cars with friends who have been drinking. So remind your kids that they should never ride with anyone who is driving after drinking (in cars, boats, motorcycles, etc.).

As adults, it is our job to create safe environments for children that are free of alcohol. This can include providing them with alternatives during their summer months so that they fill their days with fun, learning, and growth opportunities. Some free and affordable options might include:

  • Volunteering at a local animal shelter or nursing home
  • Swimming at the neighborhood pool
  • Starting a side business, such as dog walking, lawn mowing, or babysitting
  • Working through next year’s school reading list at the local library
  • Planting an herb or vegetable garden
  • Enrolling in a photography or writing class at your local community college

Finally, don’t leave alcohol available in your home; if you have alcohol in your home, lock it up.  You should also check in with parents to see if they have alcohol accessible in their home before your children hang out there.

There are endless ways to fill a summer day that don’t involve underage drinking. And, studies show that the longer kids wait to take their first drink, the lower the odds are that they’ll develop alcohol abuse or dependence as adults. Preventing young people from drinking underage also means we’re protecting them from many of the negative consequences they’re more likely to experience when they drink – things like alcohol-related car crashes and other injuries (e.g., burns, falling, and drowning), unplanned or unprotected sexual activity, physical and sexual assault, abuse of other drugs, or even death from alcohol poisoning.

We hope you’ll get involved in your kids’ daily activities and keep them safe and alcohol-free this summer. For more information about what you can do to help prevent underage drinking with your kids and in your community, contact us at TST@TexansStandingTall.org or 512.442.7501. And, if you have ideas about other safe and healthy activities for youth during the summer months, share them in the comments section down below!

Reflections from AP18

 

In April,  several Texans Standing Tall staff members attended the 2018 Alcohol Policy Conference (AP18) in Arlington, VA.

The conference is convened by the U.S. Alcohol Policy Alliance and brings together professionals in support of effective alcohol policy research and practice to tackle the enormous alcohol-related harm affecting our communities on a global scale. Texans Standing Tall is proud to have participated in the event by serving on the planning committee and as a sponsor, providing staff volunteers, and presenting during several sessions over the course of the week. (Scroll down for photos!)

We could write a novel filled with all of the great information discussed and disseminated at AP18, but some of the major highlights from the week include:

  • Multiple sessions with updated information on the link between alcohol and cancer, where we learned more about national and international efforts to educate the public on the issue. Currently, in the U.S., there is lack of public awareness regarding the connection between the two – only 30% of Americans identify alcohol as a risk factor for cancer. Moving forward, it will be critically important for prevention advocates to inform the public of the increased risk and address claims about the positive health benefits of alcohol consumption.
  • Ongoing conversations about the ways in which alcohol advertising influences youth alcohol use. In addition to studies examining the marketing practices the alcohol industry employs to target young people, we also learned about new tools like the Alcohol Marketing Assessment Rating Tool (AMART) that researchers have developed to quickly asses how well the alcohol industry is actually sticking to their self-regulated marketing codes. As advocates, we must continue to vigilantly monitor the alcohol industry’s advertising practices and hold them accountable when they market adult products to our youth.
  • A presentation on the CDC’s new guide to help measure and regulate alcohol outlet density to prevent excessive drinking and improve public health. We also heard about a new study from the Prevention Research Center of PIRE that explores the relationship between community problems and outlets that sell alcohol for off-premise consumption. It became even more clear that communities must work to identify and collect data (like place of last drink and crime levels near outlets) that help illustrate the issues associated with the number of outlets in a given area.
  • Learning inspiring lessons from advocates who worked tirelessly to get alcohol sales shut down in Whiteclay, Nebraska– an unincorporated town with less than 12 residents, but four beers stores that supplied more than 3.5 million cans of beer annually to residents of the nearby Pine Ridge Indian Reservation. For years, the community fought to close the stores, all the while experiencing high addiction rates and a number of devastating health outcomes like infant mortality, teen suicide, and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD). Finally, on April 30, 2017, the Nebraska Liquor Control Commission’s decision to deny the stores’ re-licensure applications went into effect. The story of Whiteclay is a good reminder that the road to victory can be long and challenging, but the power and persistence of people’s voices is undeniable.

The gathering of so many individuals committed to translating sound public policy into public health practice was inspiring. Texans Standing Tall staff members returned from AP18 with a renewed commitment to our prevention work across the state.

Here are just a few of the things staff had to say about their time at AP18:

“To be surrounded by such passionate individuals who share a common vision of a world free from alcohol-related death, disease, and injury – there is nothing else like it. It was an honor to attend a conference where so many of the people whose work I have been reading and learning about for years were in attendance. I’m grateful for their dedication and the positive impact they have on the world.” — Sachin Kamble, Peer Policy Fellow

“It was fascinating to see and hear from prevention super stars at AP18.  It was a passionate group of professionals coming together to inspire and strategize on how to shape alcohol policy.  I was proud to be a part of it.” — Tammy Peck, Higher Education Prevention Specialist

“I had the opportunity to attend the Advocacy Institute, which was conducted in conjunction with AP18. During one session, a nonprofit attorney, provided information about how nonprofits can work on public policy issues without threatening their tax exemption status. There was so much important information for those of us working in the public policy realm. I’m excited to put this information into action as we begin to tackle marijuana legalization efforts in Texas.” — Kaleigh Becker, Program and Research Specialist

 “Attending AP18 was a great opportunity to learn from leading experts in the field of alcohol prevention who were sharing new data that empowers individuals and coalitions to be the champions for change in their own communities across the world.” — Anne-Shirley Schreiner, Strategy Specialist

The AP conference truly is a great way to learn more about the latest data and most pressing issues related to alcohol research and policy in the United States and around the world. To learn more about it, visit alcoholpolicyconference.org and set your calendars for the next one in April 2020!

TST staff headed to AP18
Bright-eyed and bushy-tailed TST staff ready for a full day of learning
Kaleigh Becker, TST’s Research & Program Specialist, sharing information about the Coalitions Project during her poster session
Tammy Peck, TST’s Higher Education Prevention Specialist, during her poster session on Screening & Brief Intervention
TST CEO Nicole Holt giving a presentation on Social Ordinances in Texas
YLC Co-Chair Katy Turner answering an audience question during a presentation about youth engagement with fellow YLC Co-Chair Andrea Marquez and TST’s Georgianne Crowell and Atalie Nitibhon
TST staff exploring the nation’s capital

Court Ruling Challenges Little-Known System That Benefits Public Health

This March, just one month before Alcohol Awareness Month, a federal court in Austin ruled that giant retailers like Walmart and Costco can begin selling hard liquor.

Current law prohibits Texas’ publicly traded businesses from owning liquor stores. In the long run, this law is good for public health because it limits consumer availability of liquor and the consequences that come with it.

This fight is a long time coming. More than three years ago, Walmart sued the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission, arguing state liquor laws “unfairly gave family-owned chains the right to obtain unlimited liquor store permits while shutting the largest U.S. retailer out of the lucrative market entirely,” according to this Texas Tribune article.

This court ruling directly affects our current three-tier system of alcohol distribution, which helps the federal and state governments regulate and control the alcohol industry. As its name suggests, the three-tier system is composed of, you guessed it, three tiers:

Tier 1: Suppliers/Producers – anyone who actually makes or supplies the alcohol (e.g., breweries).

Tier 2: Distributors/Wholesalers – those who get alcohol from the suppliers/producers to the places where you buy or consume it.

Tier 3: Retailers – anywhere consumers can get alcohol (e.g., bars, restaurants, grocery stores, package stores)

It’s a rather complicated system and if you’re interested in learning more about it, we’d recommend reading some of Pam Erickson’s work, or checking out Toward Liquor Control, or sending us an email with any questions you may have. However, the bottom line is this: the three-tier system is incredibly important for public health and safety, especially as it relates to our kids.

It may not seem like a big deal, but a system most people are unfamiliar with is protecting our public health, and most of us are unaware that there are strong forces at work seeking to dismantle this system through alcohol deregulation. Small changes like these add up over time and ultimately create situations where we’ve expanded availability of and access to a product that is not an ordinary commodity; it is not like apple juice, where the most likely danger of overconsumption is a full and gurgly tummy.

Let’s paint a picture.

Let’s say Walmart, or another big box store, is now able to sell alcohol. Where do they put it? Is it in a separate section of the store where you must be 21 to enter (like liquor stores)? Or, as you and your family are strolling down the aisles, do you pass the soda…then the beer…and now you’re face to face with a bottle of whiskey?

Adults would no longer need to go to liquor stores, where even the cashier has to be at least 21 years old, to get their whiskey and vodka. With this new “convenience” and increased availability, they can buy liquor while buying groceries, making alcohol to appear as an everyday household item with no risks to our kids.

What about the 16-year-old cashier at a major retailer, who is allowed to sell alcohol in a grocery store under current law? Will this young cashier be more likely to sell whiskey or vodka to his underage friends when they go through his checkout line? How will this tie in with the emergence of online delivery apps, which we recently explored? Will online grocery store delivery now include a bottle of liquor that can be ordered by your teenager?

We don’t yet know all the public health and safety problems we’ll face under this new court ruling, but we do know one thing: when we increase access to alcohol we increase its use among underage drinkers.

We also know that alcohol-impaired driving is a problem among young people. They aren’t binging on milk or soda then crashing a car, they are drinking alcohol and making dangerous decisions. Treating alcohol like other commodities and expanding youth access to it can be a deadly business.

For now, as this case winds its way through the courts, Texans won’t see any changes to liquor availability at large retailers….yet. Advocates should still stay on guard because once again, we find ourselves in a situation where business interests seem to be taking priority over the best interest of our communities and our kids.

The three-tier system “balances alcohol availability, price, and promotional practices” and is an important mechanism for enforcing existing regulations, according to Pam Erickson, former director of the Oregon Liquor Control Commission. And yet, despite its major public health benefits, others are working to dismantle the three-tier system so they can increase their bottom line. In the meantime, we’re closely watching what happens and hope you’ll join us in our efforts to keep the system intact so our communities are healthy and safe for everyone.

If you have any questions, or to get involved, contact us at 512.442.7501 or TST@TexansStandingTall.org.

 

 

 

 

Alcohol Delivery Apps Bring Booze Via Smartphone

Growing up, many of us delighted in the occasional pizza delivery on a weekend night. Packages from the postman arrived when faraway relatives sent birthday and holiday gifts. The term “app” was an abbreviation for “appetizer.”

But in 2018, cardboard boxes are a front-porch staple, and we expect most of our products to be delivered in a matter of days. Delivery apps cut that time down to hours or minutes, bringing groceries, restaurant food, drivers, and household goods to our front doors in no time. It is no surprise that there’s a fast-growing market for alcohol delivery, too.

It’s also no surprise that delivery apps make it easier for underage drinkers to get alcohol through delivery services than from bars or retail stores. The bottom line is that these apps create greater and easier access to alcohol, which is the exact opposite of what we need to do to reduce and prevent underage drinking.

A recent Austin American-Statesman story reported that “in a handful of sting operations conducted by Texas regulators, people younger than the legal drinking age of 21 were able to obtain alcohol using app-based delivery services at more than twice the rate generally found in similar sting operations conducted in bars and liquor stores.”

Until recently, alcohol delivery has predominantly consisted of high-end wine sales; youth aren’t exactly the target market for this kind of online alcohol purchasing.

Now, mobile apps like Drizly and Postmates promise fast alcohol delivery – from beer to bourbon – to our front doors. With smart phones in the hands of roughly 4 in 5 youth, this type of direct shipment to private residences is just a download away for your junior high, high-school, or underage college student.

In this convenience economy, there are many questions that still need to be answered about this new delivery model: Who should be licensed? How do you prevent access by minors?  Who is held accountable for violations?

Ultimately, it will be up to our lawmakers to establish a regulatory framework that addresses public safety, and Texans Standing Tall will be working to make sure future policies address prevention and limit youth access.

As we continue to follow the issue, we will keep everyone updated on what we learn. So, if you haven’t already, make sure to follow us on social media, subscribe to our newsletter, or reach out to us at any time with questions or for more information. And, if you’re alarmed about how these delivery apps increase youth access and would like to get involved by providing testimony during any hearings on the topic, contact Atalie at ANitibhon@TexansStandingTall.org.

Popularity of E-Cigarettes is a Public Health Matter

 

Snapchat. iPhones. Emojis. Selfies.

Of all the things teens think are cool, e-cigarettes – and the JUUL brand, in particular – should be among the most concerning.

We know e-cigarettes are making their way into the hands of youth, who are curious, attracted to the easy-to-hide design and fun flavors like crème brulee, or influenced by their peers. JUUL is especially popular because they are sleek and resemble a thumb drive, with teens saying they are “discreet enough to vape in class.”

We also know teens and adults find e-cigarettes appealing because they still believe they are less harmful than other tobacco products. But that doesn’t mean they are safe.

Case in point: one significant new study of nearly 70,000 people revealed that daily e-cigarette use can double the risk of a heart attack. When you consider that e-cigarettes are increasingly becoming a gateway to smoking among youth, these studies should be a concern.

But your average teen isn’t concerned about their chances of a heart attack — or other major health concerns like cancer; they’re drawn to e-cigarettes like JUUL, which “has developed a cult-like following among youth and young adults, fueled by a strong presence on social media sites like YouTube.”

Still, the popularity of JUUL and other e-cigarettes should be alarming to the public health community, since we know that exposure to nicotine during adolescence can cause addiction and harm the developing brain, and that children using e-cigarettes are at an a increased risk of using tobacco cigarettes in the future.

Moreover, e-cigarette use among middle and high school students more than tripled from 2013 to 2015. For the first time ever, teens are smoking e-cigarettes more than traditional cigarettes.

As concerned community members, we can advocate for regulation of e-cigarettes by the FDA, which has had the authority to regulate them since 2016 but has delayed implementation of key provisions. We can also share public health materials to build public awareness about potential harms associated with use of JUUL and other e-cigarettes. Several resources are emerging, including educational toolkit materials for teens developed by the Stanford University Department of Medicine, a Truth Initiative fact sheet, and a Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids fact sheet. Finally, we can get involved with local coalitions like the Galveston/Bay Area and the Wichita County TPCCs (Tobacco Prevention and Control Coalitions) that are working to pass comprehensive smoke-free ordinances and Tobacco21 laws that would prevent anyone under the age of 21 from purchasing tobacco products.

If you have any questions or want more information about what you can do in your community on this issue or other tobacco-related issues, please contact Steve at SRoss@TexansStandingTall.org or 512.442.7501.