Action Alert: Are you concerned about tobacco? Marijuana? Powdered Alcohol?

TST's 2016 Statewide Summit August 3-4.
Issues you care about.

logo_600

Action Alert

Join us Aug. 3-4, 2016 at TST's Statewide Summit

Dive into...


9b5c51b3-7c17-4e11-92d7-86d2b3b84b1aTobacco

-Jennifer Cofer, MD Anderson Cancer Center, will draw on personal experience to teach coalitions how to fight for sustainable funding.

-Dr. Phil Gardiner, University of California Office of the President, will speak about the triangulum between tobacco, marijuana, and e-cigarettes.

 

c468fa20-a838-4b78-9c4f-1080c3a132ebMarijuana

-Michael Sparks, President of Sparks Initiatives, will discuss marijuana legalization, medical marijuana, and what communities can do in the face of the changing political landscape.

902f4c5e-251e-41ad-b1a3-b27554ff8a69-1Powdered Alcohol

-Nicole Holt, Chief Executive Officer of TST, will speak about the potential for powdered alcohol sales in Texas.

-Atalie Nitibhon, TST's Director of Research and Advocacy, will guide a break out session on how to educate others about the dangers of powdered alcohol.

 


2016 Statewide Summit

August 3-4, 2016

Texans Standing Tall's 2016 Statewide Summit is a two-day event bringing together national and state experts, the TST Youth Leadership Council, and summit participants to collaborate for substance use prevention and community change statewide. Texans Standing Tall is the statewide coalition where prevention comes together. Join us for change! Visit our website for more information.


REGISTER
Registration is easy! Register on our website before July 11, 2016 for only $125! Lunch and materials included.

BOOK YOUR HOTEL
Only one week left! TST's discounted group lodging rate of $129 a night expires July 5, 2016! Book today with the code "Texans Standing Tall" to get this discount!

Texans Standing Tall
2211 South IH-35, Suite 201
Austin, Texas 78741
(512) 442-7501

Action Alert: Remind Anheuser-Busch InBev America isn’t for sale

logo_600

Action Alert

Tell Budweiser America is not for sale

Join the U.S. Alcohol Policy Alliance, a national coalition of organizations working to prevent alcohol-related harm, and Public Citizens Commercial Alert in responding to Anheuser-Busch InBev's rebranding of Budweiser as 'America'.

THE PROBLEM: BUYING CREDIBILITY ON A FAKE ID
Anheuser-Busch InBev (ABI), the world's largest beer producer, has rebranded its Budweiser brand with 'America' on its packaging for the election season from May 23 through November.

The beer giant's marketing gimmick to capitalize on America's national pride during an election year is a shameful act of corporate greed under the guise of patriotism. This stunt exploits America's sentiment of national pride and attaches it instead to a product that is the leading cause of death, disease, and disability for Americans aged 15-49.

THE FACTS: WHY IT MATTERS
Budweiser is the third leading brand among underage drinkers, largely due to its ever-present marketing. That marketing often features cute animals and other youth-alluring 'hooks.'

We know what brands and which companies are profiting the most from underage drinkers in the U.S. More than 42% of underage youth sampled (13-20 years old) in a 2013 study reported drinking Bud Light or Budweiser.

WHAT YOU CAN DO

1. The U.S. Alcohol Policy Alliance, a national coalition of organizations working to prevent alcohol-related harm, in partnership with Public Citizen's Commercial Alert is asking Americans to stand up and reject Budweiser's marketing stunt.
Join us in a social media blitz to voice your disgust with the company's act to claim American patriotism as it's own by updating your Facebook status or tweeting:

"#Budweiser is shamelessly exploiting 'patriotism' in a stunt of corporate greed. #ThisBudsForYou is not America. http://thndr.me/lqcg55" (Feel free to save and use the meme below along with your social media post).

2. Submit a letter to the editor or opinion piece to traditional or electronic news media- or post to social media- armed with information from U.S. APA's fact sheet.

3. Reach out to your members of Congress to urge them to provide more guidance to the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) which allowed this labeling stunt into the market.

4. Use this news release provided by U.S. APA as a blueprint for a local press release. Rework it to fit your needs by creating your own quotes from someone or persons locally.

6256f110-4eaa-4084-94f9-c0e27945aa50

Texans Standing Tall
2211 South IH-35, Suite 201
Austin, Texas 78741
(512) 442-7501

Action Alert: Keep Alcohol Ads Off DC Metro

logo_600

Action Alert

Washington, DC Public Transit Considering Reversing Rule Banning Alcohol Advertising

Action:
Email your comments to BoardofDirectors@wmata.com to support the current ban on alcohol advertising on DC Metro trains and buses and in stations.  Comments are due TODAY, November 18, by 11:00am CST. The vote will take place tomorrow, November 19th.
 
Background:
The Board of Directors of the Washington Metro Area Transit Authority (WMATA) banned alcohol advertising from public transit 21 years ago. It is considering rescinding the ban on alcohol advertising in order to create additional revenue, which will expose the metro population of nearly 6 million people plus millions of tourists to excessive alcohol advertising.
 
This rule change would be a step backwards for DC. In the U.S., 17 other major metropolitan areas have similar bans on alcohol advertising, with Boston, San Francisco, and Philadelphia enacting bans in just the last decade. Reversing the ban would be a harmful step for the district and its youth and the millions of tourists who visit DC and use the Metro to get around. 

Talking Points

  • Current research indicates that the more youth are exposed to alcohol advertising the more likely they are to consume alcohol and binge drink.
  • The cost of alcohol-related harm that the DC government bears far exceeds the revenue the transit authority will generate from alcohol advertising. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Washington DC has the highest cost of alcohol-related harm among U.S. metro areas at $1,526 per person, almost twice the national average.
  • 19 million tourists, including youth, depend on the Metro when traveling to D.C. Additionally, the WMATA provides free transportation to thousands of D.C. public and charter school students through their Kids Ride Free on Rail program. Selling alcohol advertising on the Metro system is effectively offering up youth as a captive audience to alcohol marketing.
  • From Alcohol Justice's 2013 report These Bus Ads Don't Stop for Children: Alcohol Advertising on Public Transit: "It makes no sense for public transit agencies or cities to allow alcohol advertising that recoups less than 1% of their operating revenues while governments in the U.S. bear the burden of over $90 billion in annual costs from alcohol-related harm. Less than 1% of total operating revenue is just not worth all of the added risk of youth exposure to ads and alcohol-related public costs."

Texans Standing Tall
2211 South IH-35, Suite 201
Austin, Texas 78741
(512) 442-7501

Action Alert: Powdered Alcohol

logo_600

Action Alert

Powdered Alcohol For Sale in Texas this Summer

1e1f5452-db52-408d-bea8-967a2bc752ee

What's the issue?
Powdered alcohol will officially hit the market in Texas this summer.

Why the concern?
Palcohol (powdered alcohol) is alcohol in a powdered form, sold in a 1 ounce packet that is the equivalent of a shot. Public health and safety experts are concerned that this product is easy to conceal, and that there is a potential for overconsumption, or even spiking other's drinks.
We know that these types of products have proven most popular among the heaviest drinking and more risk-prone youth and we are concerned that there will be an increase in underage binge drinking and alcohol poisoning after the product hits the shelves.

b1a589d4-6ad0-4966-a278-fbdc402c8f0a

Why are we alerting you now?
HB 1018, a bill to ban powdered alcohol was introduced by State Representative Charlie Geren. Despite being scheduled for consideration by the full House of Representatives, Rep. Geren killed his own bill after speaking to "people in the industry" and deciding to wait and see what happens when the product is introduced in Texas.

What can you do? They heard from the industry. Did they hear from you?  It is critical that our decision makers hear from everyone on such important issues. To learn who represents you, click here.

To view a Powdered Alcohol fact sheet created by the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth, click here.

To read Texans Standing Tall's most recent interview on powdered alcohol and the prevalence of underage drinking in Texas, click here.

For more information or talking points on powdered alcohol, or to learn how you can get involved with Texans Standing Tall, contact Grace at gbarnett@texansstandingtall.org.

 

Texans Standing Tall
2211 South IH-35, Suite 201
Austin, Texas 78741
(512) 442-7501

Action Alert: 9 Hours Left! Have You Commented Yet?

logo_600

Action Alert

Countdown for Comments on US Dietary Guidelines

9 HOURS LEFT!

Thank you to everyone who commented already. We submitted our comments this morning and with your support we can make sure that the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for alcohol are maintained.

If you have not had the chance to comment, you still have 9 hours to make your voice heard. The US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee is proposing to alter the definition of "moderate drinking" and to encourage moderate drinking as part of a healthy diet. You must submit comments by tonight at 10:59 pm.  Comment now by clicking here.

Already advocates from across the country have commented on the failure of the proposed guidelines to define moderate, heavy and binge drinking. It is easy to comment and doesn't take much time at all.

All you need to do is submit your contact information which can remain private, check the box for "General Comment" under Topics, and say "We urge you to retain the 2010 US Dietary Guidelines regarding moderate alcohol consumption." Click submit and you will have contributed to the public dialogue on this critical public health issue.

To view comments written by advocates from across the country, click here.

For more information on the proposed guidelines, or for talking points to help you draft your comments, click here for a fact sheet created by the US Alcohol Policy Alliance, or contact Grace at gbarnett@texansstandingtall.org.

 

Texans Standing Tall
2211 South IH-35, Suite 201
Austin, Texas 78741
(512) 442-7501

Action Alert: 32 Hours Left! Have You Commented Yet?

logo_600

Action Alert

Countdown for Comments on US Dietary Guidelines

32 HOURS LEFT!

Have you commented yet? You have 32 hours to make your voice heard. The US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee is proposing to alter the definition of "moderate drinking" and to encourage moderate drinking as part of a healthy diet. You must submit comments by tomorrow, May 8th at 11:59 pm E.D.T.  Comment now by clicking here.

Already advocates from across the country have commented on the failure of the proposed guidelines to define moderate, heavy and binge drinking. It is easy to comment and doesn't take much time at all.

All you need to do is submit your contact information which can remain private, check the box for "General Comment" under Topics, and say "We urge you to retain the 2010 US Dietary Guidelines regarding moderate alcohol consumption." Click submit and you will have contributed to the public dialogue on this critical public health issue.

To view comments written by advocates from across the country, click here.

For more information on the proposed guidelines, or for talking points to help you draft your comments, click here for a fact sheet created by the US Alcohol Policy Alliance, or contact Grace at gbarnett@texansstandingtall.org.

 

Texans Standing Tall
2211 South IH-35, Suite 201
Austin, Texas 78741
(512) 442-7501

Action Alert: Last Chance to Comment: Defining Moderate Drinking

logo_600

Action Alert

Defining Moderate Drinking in Dietary Guidelines

Your input is needed!

The US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee is proposing to alter the definition of "moderate drinking" and to encourage moderate drinking as part of a healthy diet. To make sure your voice is heard, you must submit comments by Friday, May 8th at 11:59 pm E.D.T. Comment now by clicking here.

Already advocates from across the country have commented on the failure of the proposed guidelines to define moderate, heavy and binge drinking. It is easy to comment and doesn't take much time at all. All you need to say is "We urge you to retain the 2010 US Dietary Guidelines regarding moderate alcohol consumption."

To view comments written by advocates from across the country, click here.

For more information on the proposed guidelines, or for talking points to help you draft your comments, click here for a fact sheet created by the US Alcohol Policy Alliance, or contact Grace at gbarnett@texansstandingtall.org.

Texans Standing Tall
2211 South IH-35, Suite 201
Austin, Texas 78741
(512) 442-7501

Action Alert: Provision to Minors Law Considered in House Committee

logo_600

Action Alert

Additional Penalties for Providing Alcoholic Beverages to a Minor

On Monday, April 27th at 2 pm, the House Committee on Licensing & Administrative Procedures will hear two bills regarding the Provision to Minors Law.

HB 770 amends the current law that imposes a civil penalty on social hosts only when they provide alcohol to someone under 18, so that a civil penalty will now be imposed on any social host that provides alcohol to a minor (anyone under 21).

HB 1844 increases the criminal penalty for social hosts if the minor, as a result of consuming the alcohol, causes serious injury or death to another person. In those cases, rather than a Class A misdemeanor, the social host will be charged with a state jail felony.

The House Committee will consider other bills related to alcohol policy including:

HB 2118 which would allow for alcoholic beverages to be sold from automated dispensing machines at licensed locations to employees of permittees or individuals identified as 21 by the permittee. The machine could serve 2 servings of wine or liquor and 2.5 servings of beer before the customer would have to reactivate their account with the permittee.

HB 2262 will repeal the prohibition on open containers in packaging stores.

HB 2882 amends the Alcoholic Beverage Code regarding the ability of local governments to impose fees on permittees. The bill would require the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission to deny or cancel permits for those that fail to pay the local fee, and requires the Commission to establish a procedure for collecting and distributing the fee to the local government.

For more information on these bills, or other bills currently before the Texas Legislature regarding alcohol, tobacco and drugs, please contact Grace Barnett at gbarnett@texansstandingtall.org or (512) 442-7501.

Texans Standing Tall
2211 South IH-35, Suite 201
Austin, Texas 78741
(512) 442-7501

Action Alert: Defining Moderate Drinking – DEADLINE EXTENDED

logo_600

Action Alert

DEADLINE EXTENDED

Defining Moderate Drinking in Dietary Guidelines

The US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee is proposing to alter the definition of "moderate drinking" and to encourage moderate drinking as part of a healthy diet.

Current (2010) Dietary Guidelines define moderate drinking as up to 1 drink a day for women and up to 2 drinks a day for men. The 2015 Guidelines change the definition of moderate alcohol consumption to 1 - 3 drinks a day for women and
2 - 4 drinks a day for men.

Why the concern?
The definition of moderate drinking is too broad and promotes a consumption level just shy of binge-drinking. According to the CDC, binge drinking is 4 drinks (for women) and 5 drinks (for men) within a 2-hour sitting. The 2015 Guidelines do not define binge-drinking.
The proposed Guidelines suggest moderate drinking can be healthy, without specifying what is a standard drink. A standard drink is 12 oz of beer, 5 oz of wine, or 1.5 oz of liquor. On average, a person needs 1 hour to process a standard drink.
We want the guidelines to provide clarity to the public about what moderate drinking levels are. Please take the opportunity to issue a public comment in favor of maintaining the 2010 Guidelines due to the greater specificity provided. Submitting public comment here does not constitute lobbying, because it is not a legislative body.

The deadline to provide comments on the Guidelines has been extended to May 8, 2015.

Submit online comments here.

To view the 2010 Dietary Guidelines, click here.

For additional information, view a Fact Sheet from US Alcohol Policy Alliance

Want to participate but don't know how?
Call and we'll walk you through the process.
Grace Barnett at gbarnett@texansstandingtall.org or (512) 442-7501.

Texans Standing Tall
2211 South IH-35, Suite 201
Austin, Texas 78741
(512) 442-7501

Action Alert: Defining Moderate Drinking

logo_600

Action Alert

YOUR INPUT NEEDED!

Defining Moderate Drinking in Dietary Guidelines

Call for public comment on change in US Dietary Guidelines on Alcohol.

The US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee is proposing to increase limits to define "moderate drinking" and to encourage moderate drinking as part of a healthy diet.

Current (2010) guidelines define moderate drinking as up to 1 drink a day for women and up to 2 drinks a day for men. The proposed change increases moderate drinking levels to up to 3 drinks a day for women and up to 4 drinks a day for men. This triples the daily limit for women and doubles the
daily limit for men.

The proposed changes also include moderate drinking as a component to a healthy diet. However, new studies have determined there are risks to drinking alcohol even at low levels.

The changes proposed by the US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee encourages a higher level of alcohol consumption which correlates to negative impacts on public health. Research shows that the risk of harm goes up with increased drinking. Americans should be encouraged to drink less in order to help prevent alcohol-related health and public safety issues.

Deadline: April 8, 2015

Comments: Submit online here.

Talking Points: Fact Sheet from US Alcohol Policy Alliance

Want to participate but don't know how?
Call and we'll walk you through the process.
Grace Barnett at gbarnett@texansstandingtall.org or (512) 442-7501.

Texans Standing Tall
2211 South IH-35, Suite 201
Austin, Texas 78741
(512) 442-7501