Alcohol Delivery

Alcohol Delivery Apps Bring Booze Via Smartphone

Growing up, many of us delighted in the occasional pizza delivery on a weekend night. Packages from the postman arrived when faraway relatives sent birthday and holiday gifts. The term “app” was an abbreviation for “appetizer.”

But in 2018, cardboard boxes are a front-porch staple, and we expect most of our products to be delivered in a matter of days. Delivery apps cut that time down to hours or minutes, bringing groceries, restaurant food, drivers, and household goods to our front doors in no time. It is no surprise that there’s a fast-growing market for alcohol delivery, too.

It’s also no surprise that delivery apps make it easier for underage drinkers to get alcohol through delivery services than from bars or retail stores. The bottom line is that these apps create greater and easier access to alcohol, which is the exact opposite of what we need to do to reduce and prevent underage drinking.

A recent Austin American-Statesman story reported that “in a handful of sting operations conducted by Texas regulators, people younger than the legal drinking age of 21 were able to obtain alcohol using app-based delivery services at more than twice the rate generally found in similar sting operations conducted in bars and liquor stores.”

Until recently, alcohol delivery has predominantly consisted of high-end wine sales; youth aren’t exactly the target market for this kind of online alcohol purchasing.

Now, mobile apps like Drizly and Postmates promise fast alcohol delivery – from beer to bourbon – to our front doors. With smart phones in the hands of roughly 4 in 5 youth, this type of direct shipment to private residences is just a download away for your junior high, high-school, or underage college student.

In this convenience economy, there are many questions that still need to be answered about this new delivery model: Who should be licensed? How do you prevent access by minors?  Who is held accountable for violations?

Ultimately, it will be up to our lawmakers to establish a regulatory framework that addresses public safety, and Texans Standing Tall will be working to make sure future policies address prevention and limit youth access.

As we continue to follow the issue, we will keep everyone updated on what we learn. So, if you haven’t already, make sure to follow us on social media, subscribe to our newsletter, or reach out to us at any time with questions or for more information. And, if you’re alarmed about how these delivery apps increase youth access and would like to get involved by providing testimony during any hearings on the topic, contact Atalie at ANitibhon@TexansStandingTall.org.

Alcohol Delivery

Popularity of E-Cigarettes is a Public Health Matter

 

Snapchat. iPhones. Emojis. Selfies.

Of all the things teens think are cool, e-cigarettes – and the JUUL brand, in particular – should be among the most concerning.

We know e-cigarettes are making their way into the hands of youth, who are curious, attracted to the easy-to-hide design and fun flavors like crème brulee, or influenced by their peers. JUUL is especially popular because they are sleek and resemble a thumb drive, with teens saying they are “discreet enough to vape in class.”

We also know teens and adults find e-cigarettes appealing because they still believe they are less harmful than other tobacco products. But that doesn’t mean they are safe.

Case in point: one significant new study of nearly 70,000 people revealed that daily e-cigarette use can double the risk of a heart attack. When you consider that e-cigarettes are increasingly becoming a gateway to smoking among youth, these studies should be a concern.

But your average teen isn’t concerned about their chances of a heart attack — or other major health concerns like cancer; they’re drawn to e-cigarettes like JUUL, which “has developed a cult-like following among youth and young adults, fueled by a strong presence on social media sites like YouTube.”

Still, the popularity of JUUL and other e-cigarettes should be alarming to the public health community, since we know that exposure to nicotine during adolescence can cause addiction and harm the developing brain, and that children using e-cigarettes are at an a increased risk of using tobacco cigarettes in the future.

Moreover, e-cigarette use among middle and high school students more than tripled from 2013 to 2015. For the first time ever, teens are smoking e-cigarettes more than traditional cigarettes.

As concerned community members, we can advocate for regulation of e-cigarettes by the FDA, which has had the authority to regulate them since 2016 but has delayed implementation of key provisions. We can also share public health materials to build public awareness about potential harms associated with use of JUUL and other e-cigarettes. Several resources are emerging, including educational toolkit materials for teens developed by the Stanford University Department of Medicine, a Truth Initiative fact sheet, and a Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids fact sheet. Finally, we can get involved with local coalitions like the Galveston/Bay Area and the Wichita County TPCCs (Tobacco Prevention and Control Coalitions) that are working to pass comprehensive smoke-free ordinances and Tobacco21 laws that would prevent anyone under the age of 21 from purchasing tobacco products.

If you have any questions or want more information about what you can do in your community on this issue or other tobacco-related issues, please contact Steve at SRoss@TexansStandingTall.org or 512.442.7501.

Alcohol Delivery

Summit Roundup

We are grateful to everyone who led a breakout session and contributed to lively discussions during our 2018 Statewide Summit. Thank you to those who made this our most successful Summit yet! We’ll see you next year!

Below is a rundown of the panels you may have missed. And, be sure to scroll to the bottom of the post to see some photos from the event!

Reducing Risky Alcohol Use on College Campuses: The SBI Experience

Amanda Drum | Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi
Mayra Hernandez | Texas A&M University – International
Debra Murphy | Huston-Tillotson University
Melissa Sutherland | San Antonio College
Tammy Peck (Moderator) | Texans Standing Tall

Oftentimes, schools are interested in improving the campus experience for college students through their prevention efforts, but may be short on funds to provide the desired programming. During this session, participants learned about Screening and Brief Intervention (SBI) as a proven way to reduce risky drinking and its associated consequences on college campuses. They also heard from current and past SBI campus partners, then learned ways to implement SBI as a primary prevention tool and engage stakeholders in the implementation process without having to spend tons of money.

Coalition Building

Kaleigh Becker | Texans Standing Tall

During this breakout session, participants had an opportunity to engage in a conversation around building and sustaining successful coalitions. This interactive session focused on recruiting dedicated coalition members, organizing effective meetings and engaging coalition members.

Advocacy 101: Use Your Voice to Shift the Dynamics of Power

Sachin Kamble | Texans Standing Tall

During this breakout session, participants learned about the basic skills needed to become an effective advocate. The presentation included a discussion on the importance of advocacy and the role it plays in shifting power dynamics, the different types of power and influence people have, and critical steps advocates must take to have their voices heard and create community change.

Alcohol & College Life: Perspectives from Students

Adam Concha, Amy Tang, Katy Turner | Youth Leadership Council

TST’s own Youth Leadership Council led this standing-room-only breakout session discussing the pressures college students face when experiencing the “college life.” Alcohol use rates are high among Texas college students. Being a first-year college student, participating in the Greek system, or being a college athlete puts individuals at higher risk for alcohol use. During this session, the YLC shared their perspectives on college life and engaged attendees in an informative discussion on how to enhance their college alcohol use prevention efforts.

Data Download: Effectively Communicating the Problem

Kaleigh Becker | Texans Standing Tall

During this breakout session, participants learned more about the scope of the youth substance use problem in Texas. The examined key data points related to alcohol, marijuana, prescription drugs, and tobacco. In addition, participants had an opportunity to create their own infographic using an online design platform!

Excise Tax Resources & Next Steps

Nicole Holt | Texans Standing Tall

What’s going on with alcohol excise taxes? What does the 2019 legislative session hold for this important, highly effective environmental prevention strategy? Our CEO Nicole Holt discussed the challenges and opportunities for excise taxes in the upcoming year, including the anticipated budget deficit and how alcohol excise taxes can enter the conversation as a viable solution to help address the state’s fiscal needs. 

Risky Youth Behavior & Tools to Address It

AJ Cortez, Samantha De la Rosa, Andrea Marquez | Youth Leadership Council

There is an abundance of research and information that captures the risky behaviors that occur as a result of underage drinking. This issue is a priority to families across Texas. During this breakout session, TST’s Youth Leadership Council shared some of the current problems associated with underage drinking and prevention strategies to address them. They also discussed how to use TST’s Community Engagement Guide to effectively engage youth in local prevention efforts.

Alcohol Outlet Density

Michael Sparks | Sparks Initiatives

Did you know that the number of alcohol outlets in a neighborhood has a negative impact on individual and community determinants of health? Michael Sparks, alcohol policy expert, led participants through the basics of outlet density during this session: what alcohol outlet density is and the role it plays in public health and safety. Based on information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this session provided information coalitions need to 1) identify the number of outlets in communities, and 2) engage in discussions about addressing alcohol outlet density in their communities.

College Campus Prevention: Tools & Resources

Tammy Peck | Texans Standing Tall

Excessive alcohol use among students continues to be a problem for college campuses. During this session, participants learned about ways they can review and enhance their prevention efforts with limited resources (both time and money). Participants also learned more about the data from Texans Standing Tall’s most recent Higher Education Report and how they can apply this information to their work with/at colleges and universities. Additionally, TST demonstrated the online college policy tool it is building to help schools, parents, students, and community members learn more about the effectiveness of different campus alcohol policies.

The 3-Tier System & Public Health (Continuing the Conversation)

Pam Erickson | Public Action Management, PLC
Ed Swedberg | Board of Directors, Texans Standing Tall

During this presentation, attendees had the opportunity to dig deeper into the ramifications of attempts to dismantle the 3-Tier System (3TS) of Alcohol Distribution. Participants engaged with experts Pam Erickson and Ed Swedberg on what is happening at the national, state, and local levels surrounding the 3TS. Topics included how permitters and permittees can use the system to benefit alcohol distributers and increased sales with little thought to public health, how impaired driving rates and underage drinking are affected by the enforcement of the 3TS, and issues presented by online delivery services.

Addressing Marijuana Legalization in Texas

Kaleigh Becker | Texans Standing Tall
Michael Sparks | Sparks Initiatives

During this breakout session, participants had an opportunity to have an in-depth conversation about 1) marijuana legislation in Texas, 2) other states’ experience with expanded marijuana policies, and 3) the public health, social, and economic implications of expanded marijuana policies. In addition, participants determined the next steps for the Marijuana Workgroup.

Powdered Alcohol: A Bad Mix for Texas

Sachin Kamble | Texans Standing Tall

During this session, TST’s Sachin Kamble discussed where we’ve been, where we are, and where we’re headed with powdered alcohol. The presentation covered what powdered alcohol is, why were concerned about it making its way to the marketplace, and previous legislative action related to powdered alcohol in Texas. It also included thoughts on powdered alcohol and the upcoming legislative session.

Social Media Advocacy: Building Your Coalition and Strategy Base

Laura Hoke | Laura Hoke Public Relations
Steve Ross | Texans Standing Tall

Social media is an essential tool for your community advocacy efforts. During this breakout, participants learned tips from public relations and communications expert Laura Hoke to increase, engage, and maintain your social media audience. The session reviewed how to use social media to communicate your message, how to reach your target audience, and how to interpret the analytics to gauge if the messaging is effective.

Bummed you missed any of these great breakout sessions? Never fear, TST training is here! Contact us at tst@texansstandingtall.org or 512.442.7501 to learn more about the trainings TST has to offer on any of the topics listed above, plus many others.

Youth Leadership Council (YLC) members with TST’s Youth Engagement Specialist, Sedrick Ntwali, getting ready to start Day 1 of Summit.Nigel Wrangham delivering his opening keynote presentation. TST CEO Nicole Holt during her excise tax breakout session.YLC members Lauren Oliver, Amy Tang, Katy Turner, Adam Concha, and Emily Hottman with Georgianne Crowell, TST’s Director of Community Outreach and Education, and Maria Caldera Morales, their YLC sponsor and Community Coalition Partnerships Grant Coordinator at The Coalition.TST’s Peer Policy Fellow, Sachin Kamble, and Youth Engagement Specialist, Sedrick Ntwali.The H2i Coalition Team from Odessa.YLC Members  AJ Cortez, Andrea Marquez, Nathaniel Fomby, and Jesus Cabrales.TST’s Nicole Holt with Pam Erickson and TST Board Member Ed Swedberg, who spoke about the Three-Tier System. Day 1 Breakout Sessions.MADD Victim Advocates Dani Simien and Kathy Hernandez during their breakout session on becoming advocates.  Amber Newby and Kathleen Armstrong Staas from the Blanco Coalition of Awareness, Prevention, and Treatment of Substance Abuse (CoAPT).Our friends from the RED Program with advocates Dani Simien and Kathy Hernandez. Day 2 Breakout Sessions.

Do you have Summit pictures to share? Be sure to post them on our Facebook page  or send them to us at tst@texansstandingtall.org!

 

 

Alcohol Delivery

Hidalgo County Sees Groundswell of Smoke Free Ordinances

“Community buy-in.” That’s the phrase Gilda Bowen uses to describe the wave of comprehensive smoke-free ordinances recently passed in communities throughout the county. Bowen is the Tobacco Coordinator for the Hidalgo County Tobacco Prevention Cessation Coalition (TPCC).

When the Hidalgo County TPCC formed in February of 2014, only one smoke-free ordinance had passed within the county. Today, 17 communities are 100% smoke-free.

“Even though there are separate cities in the county, the Valley is like a large community,” said Bowen. “So every time a city passed one, it encouraged another to take it up.”

She credits the combination of grassroots efforts and support from American Heart Association, the American Cancer Society, Texans Standing Tall, and other organizations for their success.

“It took research and planning from the AHA and ACS combined with a lot of one-on-one meetings to convince civic leaders that their communities wanted this,” Bowen added.

The movement built up slowly, with the cities of Edinburg, Pharr and Mission creating smoke-free ordinances from 2014-2016. Then in 2017, momentum took over, with at least one ordinance a month being passed.

Having coalition members committed to creating smoke-free communities was the major factor in making Hidalgo County virtually smoke-free. Every agenda, handout, or email from members included updates on what was happening in cities. So when McAllen had a public hearing, they had over 200 people show up.

The coalition realizes that even with this success, their work is not over.

“There will always be more work, there will always be opportunities,” said Mrs. Bowen. “We hope the community is proud and will take ownership of some projects to continue working on enforcement and implementation.”

Texans Standing Tall understands that passing and enforcing comprehensive smoke-free ordinances is hard work, but we also believe that Texas cities are up to the challenge of implementing changes that help create healthier, safer communities – Gilda Bowen and the Hidalgo County TPCC are living proof of that. If you’re interested in learning more about passing a comprehensive smoke-free ordinance in your community, please contact Steve Ross at sross@TexansStandingTall.org.

Alcohol Delivery

Drinking Alcohol Raises Cancer Risk

Alcohol is a “definitive” risk factor for cancer, according to a statement released this month by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). 

According to ASCO, minimizing excessive exposure of alcohol has important implications for cancer prevention. In its statement, ASCO noted that alcohol consumption is causally associated with oropharyngeal (throat) and laryngeal (voicebox) cancer, esophageal cancer, liver cancer, breast cancer, and colon cancer. However, alcohol may also be a risk factor for other cancers, including pancreatic and stomach cancers.

Researchers looked at several studies that found a strong correlation between alcohol and cancer.  They concluded that 3.5% of all cancer-related deaths were due to alcohol consumption.  They further concluded that in 2012, 5.5% of new cancer occurrences and 5.8% of all cancer deaths worldwide were attributable to alcohol consumption.

“The importance of alcohol drinking as a contributing factor to the overall cancer burden is often underappreciated,” the organization said in its statement. “Associations between alcohol drinking and cancer risk have been observed consistently regardless of the specific type of alcoholic beverages.”

Another recent study shows that teens aged 14-17 are less likely to drink if they know about the link between alcohol and cancer. Unfortunately, most aren’t actually aware of the connection. To help create healthier, safter communities, Texans Standing Tall believes its especially important to share this new research so young people gain a better understanding of the consequences of alcohol consumption.

Alcohol Delivery

“Fraternities must change.”

The national fraternity Sigma Phi Epsilon took the bold initiative this month of announcing a ban on alcohol and other substances at all of its 215 chapters.

“Sigma Phi Epsilon and our peers have unfortunately earned a reputation for being organizations that promote alcohol consumption, misogyny and violence,” CEO Brian Warren said. “For SigEp, there can be no more discussion about maintaining that status quo. Fraternities must change.”

According to the Institute of Alcohol Studies, alcohol use is the leading cause of death, disease, and disability worldwide for people aged 15-49. This is a serious public health issue that deserves our attention.

Over the last few weeks, many universities have taken steps to combat the dangerous, and sometimes deadly, alcohol-related behaviors associated with Greek life.  The most recent—and closest to home—is the suspension of all Greek activity at Texas State University after the death of a 20-year-old pledge to a fraternity.

Texans Standing Tall is encouraged by the movement within the Greek community to work to end the normalization of alcohol for teenagers and young college students. Rather than supporting a narrative that claims alcohol use is “just a part of college life,” it’s important to remind students that college is a time for them to learn, grow, and develop skills for creating a bright and healthy future – that is the college experience we want them to strive for.

Alcohol Delivery

Summer Mindfulness

 

Summer can be a time for leisure and fun for many young people, but June and July also bring reduced parental supervision and increased boredom – and a drastic change in drinking patterns for adolescents.

On an average day in June or July, more than 11,000 kids, aged 12 to 17, start drinking. For most other months, that number is 5,000 to 8,000 per day.
Parents should be aware of the increased risk for drinking during summer months, and work to make sure the young people in their life have fun without alcohol.

After all, we know the myth that underage drinking is harmless is pervasive. While the biggest danger is drinking and driving, there are so many additional consequences to underage drinking.

Children who begin consuming alcohol before age 15 are six times more likely to experience alcohol dependence or abuse as adults. Additionally, underage drinking is linked to an increase in fights, sexual assaults, and unplanned sexual activity. Underage drinking also results in a higher likelihood of alcohol poisoning and injuries.

Right Under Our Noses

Young people are most likely to obtain alcohol from social settings and house parties. For this reason, parents play a critical role in preventing underage drinking – if they do not provide a space for underage drinking to occur, young people are significantly less likely to drink.

Parents should provide fun activities that do not involve alcohol; hosting get-togethers that are explicitly substance-free (a pool party, splash party, or movie night with adult supervision) can be an opportunity to bring kids together in a safe and alcohol-free environment. Parents should also check with the hosts of parties their children will be going to about whether alcohol will be served.

Social Host Ordinances

Texans Standing Tall is encouraged by a new development in some Texas cities that are adopting social host ordinances to help prevent underage drinking at house parties. So far, three Texas cities — El Paso, San Antonio, and Palmview —have adopted these ordinances that hold people accountable for underage drinking that occurs in their homes or on their property.

If you’re interested in participating in an initiative in your hometown, contact us for more information about how to implement a social host ordinance. Email Libby Banks (lbanks@texansstandingtall.org) or Brian Lemons (blemons@texansstandingtall.org), or call us at 512-442.7501.

This summer, help to encourage safe fun by being mindful of what your child does and providing appealing alternatives. We hope you have a fun and safe summer!

 

Alcohol Delivery

Happy Memorial Day from TST!

Memorial Day is coming up, so we encourage everyone to take a moment to remember those who have given their lives in service of the United States. At TST, our hearts are grateful for and humbled by the sacrifices so many honorable men, women, and families have made for our country.

The increased travel that occurs during the Memorial Day Weekend also makes it one of the most dangerous holidays on the roads. To help keep everyone safe and healthy, we’ve put together some helpful tips for travel over the holiday. Happy Memorial Day!

 

Advocacy

Prevention Advocates Convene in Austin to Meet with Lawmakers

San Antonio prevention experts, youth and TST’s Christi Koenig Brisky prepare for a day of educating lawmaker on the steps of the Texas Capitol.

­­Texans Standing Tall, along with several coalitions, individuals, and youth from across the state, went to the Texas Capitol on Feb. 28 to educate lawmakers on the importance of prevention. Approximately 70 alcohol and tobacco prevention specialists attended Texans Standing Tall’s Advocacy Day to inform their representatives on the risks associated with powdered alcohol, the public health and safety benefits of raising the alcohol excise tax, the public health benefits of raising the legal purchase age of tobacco to 21, and the critical need for tobacco prevention and control funding.

The day opened with Marjorie Clifton, with Arrow, a media consulting firm, expanding Advocacy Day participants’ knowledge on the notable outcomes from TST’s 2017 Excise Tax Survey, which was conducted by research firm Baselice & Associates. According to the survey, 65% of registered voters support a dime a drink increase, especially when the revenue generated goes to public safety and education. Increasing the alcohol excise tax by a dime a drink would generate an additional $708 million in revenue every year. By current law, 25% of alcohol excise taxes generated is automatically designated for public education; the remainder of the money could be used to fund public health and safety efforts, as well as other issues that Texans are passionate about. Raising alcohol excise taxes is also the single biggest step we can take to prevent underage alcohol use and abuse – a dime a drink would save 402 lives annually.

Advocacy Day participants also learned about Texas lawmakers’ efforts to expand the definition of alcohol to include powdered alcohol, which has a texture similar to Tang or Kool-Aid and can be added to water to make cocktails or alcoholic drinks. The expanded definition would allow the Texas Alcohol and Beverage Commission (TABC) to regulate powdered alcohol and pave the way for this dangerous substance to be sold on the market. Kitty Allen, a public health advocate from the Galveston area, spoke to Advocacy Day attendees about the dangers powdered alcohol poses to the public health and safety of our communities. Powdered alcohol comes in small, youth-friendly packages that can easily be hidden in purses and pockets, essentially making it so teenagers can carry a 30-pack in their purses and 6-packs in their pockets to school, parties, or other events. Allen attested to TST’s belief that putting powdered alcohol on the shelves is a bad mix for Texas.

Cam Scott and Kaitlyn Murphy then took over the microphone to discuss the issues Tobacco Prevention and Control Program funded coalitions are facing. Nearly 50% of tobacco funding is on the chopping block, which could result in the state’s number of new smokers trending back up. The Campaign for Drug-Free Kids reports that states where funding was cut resulted in disastrous outcomes in the quest to create a tobacco-free generation. For example, Florida experienced a massive increase in tobacco use when state funding was slashed – smoking among youth 16 and older increased by 21.2%. When the funds were restored, smoking among youth declined by 62%.

Youth Leadership Council members met with journalist Ross Ramsey from the Texas Tribune.

The duo also briefed Advocacy Day participants on the latest in tobacco prevention efforts, Tobacco21. Attendees educated lawmakers on the benefits of raising the legal purchase age of tobacco in Texas from 18 to 21. The measure has already passed in two states and multiple cities in the across the country. According to the Minimal Retail Impact of Raising Tobacco Sales Age to 21, 90% of smokers start by age 21, but the 18-20 crowd only accounts for 2.12% of tobacco sales. These are the sales that account for 9 out of every 10 new smokers. By restricting youth access to tobacco, we can significantly reduce the number of new smokers.

TST was incredibly inspired by eight of our Youth Leadership Council members, who carried out a fundraising campaign so they could join us in Austin for Advocacy Day. At the event, our youth expressed very strong feelings about the importance of preventing underage alcohol use.

“Underage drinking costs Texas $2.1 billion annually, primarily in law enforcement and health related issues, and it would be impossible to place a value on the loss of life,” YLC member Kayla Gardner said. “We took time to travel to Austin to let our lawmakers know what is going on in our communities and how important it is that they start looking at prevention as a way to protect me, my friends, and their own kids from the dangers of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs.”

All of the issues discussed at Advocacy Day are critical issues that communities need to address. The normalization of alcohol results in higher numbers of underage drinkers, traffic deaths, homicides, suicides, and sexual assaults. The normalization of alcohol and pressure from a single business kept lawmakers from banning powdered alcohol—something that more than 30 states have already done—and allowed them to put industry interests ahead of the lives of our youth. On the tobacco front, budget restraints could result in lawmakers cutting funding to tobacco programs that save countless lives and decrease tobacco-related cancer risks.

It is up to us to act on behalf on future of generations. Advocacy Day was a strong show of support from those who are passionate about reducing the negative impact alcohol and tobacco have on the health and safety of our youth. Decide to ACT today and keep the momentum going! Register to attend TST’s Statewide Summit on May 1-2 so you can be prepared for the next obstacle in protecting today’s youth.

Alcohol Delivery

Spotlight: Carlos Vela Testifies Before Senate Finance Committee

On January 31, second-year Youth Leadership Council member Carlos Vela testified about how slashing funds to the Tobacco Prevention and Control program would hurt the community wide efforts made by Tobacco Prevention and Control Coalitions (TPCC) across Texas.

Carlos testified that the proposed 47% cut in state funds would reverse all of the work that has been done to prevent youth picking up smoking at an early age.

“When I was in ninth grade, my friend and I were offered a tobacco product from a seniors in one of my high school classes. This student offered us an e-cigarette while we were at school.” Carlos said.

Carlos believes that if not for the program Students, Adults and Youth Working Hard Against Tobacco (Say What!), a program that is funded by the state, that he would have become a smoker, much like several members of his family.

“Say What! Gave me the tools I need to say no to tobacco products. The program has also provided me and my fellow students educational resources so that we can tell our friends why they not use tobacco products. In my experience, hearing information like this from your friends and peers, instead of teachers and adults is more impactful.” Carlos testified.

Carlos has participated in volunteer cigarette butt clean ups and lobbied the Ingleside City Council to pass a more comprehensive smoking ordinance.

Carlos’ fear that a $5.5 million budget cut from the Tobacco Prevention and Control Program could result in more youth smoking at an early age is not one to be taken lightly. In other U.S. states where tobacco prevention budgets have been cut youth smoking rates have increased.

He closed his testimony before the Senate Finance Committee with, “I am asking you to fully fund tobacco prevention services in the budget.”

Texans Standing Tall supports the efforts of Say What! Every year, we take our YLC members to Say What! conferences so that they can learn more about environmental prevention and more about being engaged in their communities. We are extremely proud of Carlos for having the confidence and leadership skills to speak before Texas lawmakers.