Alcohol Delivery

Summit Roundup

We are grateful to everyone who led a breakout session and contributed to lively discussions during our 2018 Statewide Summit. Thank you to those who made this our most successful Summit yet! We’ll see you next year!

Below is a rundown of the panels you may have missed. And, be sure to scroll to the bottom of the post to see some photos from the event!

Reducing Risky Alcohol Use on College Campuses: The SBI Experience

Amanda Drum | Texas A&M University – Corpus Christi
Mayra Hernandez | Texas A&M University – International
Debra Murphy | Huston-Tillotson University
Melissa Sutherland | San Antonio College
Tammy Peck (Moderator) | Texans Standing Tall

Oftentimes, schools are interested in improving the campus experience for college students through their prevention efforts, but may be short on funds to provide the desired programming. During this session, participants learned about Screening and Brief Intervention (SBI) as a proven way to reduce risky drinking and its associated consequences on college campuses. They also heard from current and past SBI campus partners, then learned ways to implement SBI as a primary prevention tool and engage stakeholders in the implementation process without having to spend tons of money.

Coalition Building

Kaleigh Becker | Texans Standing Tall

During this breakout session, participants had an opportunity to engage in a conversation around building and sustaining successful coalitions. This interactive session focused on recruiting dedicated coalition members, organizing effective meetings and engaging coalition members.

Advocacy 101: Use Your Voice to Shift the Dynamics of Power

Sachin Kamble | Texans Standing Tall

During this breakout session, participants learned about the basic skills needed to become an effective advocate. The presentation included a discussion on the importance of advocacy and the role it plays in shifting power dynamics, the different types of power and influence people have, and critical steps advocates must take to have their voices heard and create community change.

Alcohol & College Life: Perspectives from Students

Adam Concha, Amy Tang, Katy Turner | Youth Leadership Council

TST’s own Youth Leadership Council led this standing-room-only breakout session discussing the pressures college students face when experiencing the “college life.” Alcohol use rates are high among Texas college students. Being a first-year college student, participating in the Greek system, or being a college athlete puts individuals at higher risk for alcohol use. During this session, the YLC shared their perspectives on college life and engaged attendees in an informative discussion on how to enhance their college alcohol use prevention efforts.

Data Download: Effectively Communicating the Problem

Kaleigh Becker | Texans Standing Tall

During this breakout session, participants learned more about the scope of the youth substance use problem in Texas. The examined key data points related to alcohol, marijuana, prescription drugs, and tobacco. In addition, participants had an opportunity to create their own infographic using an online design platform!

Excise Tax Resources & Next Steps

Nicole Holt | Texans Standing Tall

What’s going on with alcohol excise taxes? What does the 2019 legislative session hold for this important, highly effective environmental prevention strategy? Our CEO Nicole Holt discussed the challenges and opportunities for excise taxes in the upcoming year, including the anticipated budget deficit and how alcohol excise taxes can enter the conversation as a viable solution to help address the state’s fiscal needs. 

Risky Youth Behavior & Tools to Address It

AJ Cortez, Samantha De la Rosa, Andrea Marquez | Youth Leadership Council

There is an abundance of research and information that captures the risky behaviors that occur as a result of underage drinking. This issue is a priority to families across Texas. During this breakout session, TST’s Youth Leadership Council shared some of the current problems associated with underage drinking and prevention strategies to address them. They also discussed how to use TST’s Community Engagement Guide to effectively engage youth in local prevention efforts.

Alcohol Outlet Density

Michael Sparks | Sparks Initiatives

Did you know that the number of alcohol outlets in a neighborhood has a negative impact on individual and community determinants of health? Michael Sparks, alcohol policy expert, led participants through the basics of outlet density during this session: what alcohol outlet density is and the role it plays in public health and safety. Based on information provided by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this session provided information coalitions need to 1) identify the number of outlets in communities, and 2) engage in discussions about addressing alcohol outlet density in their communities.

College Campus Prevention: Tools & Resources

Tammy Peck | Texans Standing Tall

Excessive alcohol use among students continues to be a problem for college campuses. During this session, participants learned about ways they can review and enhance their prevention efforts with limited resources (both time and money). Participants also learned more about the data from Texans Standing Tall’s most recent Higher Education Report and how they can apply this information to their work with/at colleges and universities. Additionally, TST demonstrated the online college policy tool it is building to help schools, parents, students, and community members learn more about the effectiveness of different campus alcohol policies.

The 3-Tier System & Public Health (Continuing the Conversation)

Pam Erickson | Public Action Management, PLC
Ed Swedberg | Board of Directors, Texans Standing Tall

During this presentation, attendees had the opportunity to dig deeper into the ramifications of attempts to dismantle the 3-Tier System (3TS) of Alcohol Distribution. Participants engaged with experts Pam Erickson and Ed Swedberg on what is happening at the national, state, and local levels surrounding the 3TS. Topics included how permitters and permittees can use the system to benefit alcohol distributers and increased sales with little thought to public health, how impaired driving rates and underage drinking are affected by the enforcement of the 3TS, and issues presented by online delivery services.

Addressing Marijuana Legalization in Texas

Kaleigh Becker | Texans Standing Tall
Michael Sparks | Sparks Initiatives

During this breakout session, participants had an opportunity to have an in-depth conversation about 1) marijuana legislation in Texas, 2) other states’ experience with expanded marijuana policies, and 3) the public health, social, and economic implications of expanded marijuana policies. In addition, participants determined the next steps for the Marijuana Workgroup.

Powdered Alcohol: A Bad Mix for Texas

Sachin Kamble | Texans Standing Tall

During this session, TST’s Sachin Kamble discussed where we’ve been, where we are, and where we’re headed with powdered alcohol. The presentation covered what powdered alcohol is, why were concerned about it making its way to the marketplace, and previous legislative action related to powdered alcohol in Texas. It also included thoughts on powdered alcohol and the upcoming legislative session.

Social Media Advocacy: Building Your Coalition and Strategy Base

Laura Hoke | Laura Hoke Public Relations
Steve Ross | Texans Standing Tall

Social media is an essential tool for your community advocacy efforts. During this breakout, participants learned tips from public relations and communications expert Laura Hoke to increase, engage, and maintain your social media audience. The session reviewed how to use social media to communicate your message, how to reach your target audience, and how to interpret the analytics to gauge if the messaging is effective.

Bummed you missed any of these great breakout sessions? Never fear, TST training is here! Contact us at tst@texansstandingtall.org or 512.442.7501 to learn more about the trainings TST has to offer on any of the topics listed above, plus many others.

Youth Leadership Council (YLC) members with TST’s Youth Engagement Specialist, Sedrick Ntwali, getting ready to start Day 1 of Summit.Nigel Wrangham delivering his opening keynote presentation. TST CEO Nicole Holt during her excise tax breakout session.YLC members Lauren Oliver, Amy Tang, Katy Turner, Adam Concha, and Emily Hottman with Georgianne Crowell, TST’s Director of Community Outreach and Education, and Maria Caldera Morales, their YLC sponsor and Community Coalition Partnerships Grant Coordinator at The Coalition.TST’s Peer Policy Fellow, Sachin Kamble, and Youth Engagement Specialist, Sedrick Ntwali.The H2i Coalition Team from Odessa.YLC Members  AJ Cortez, Andrea Marquez, Nathaniel Fomby, and Jesus Cabrales.TST’s Nicole Holt with Pam Erickson and TST Board Member Ed Swedberg, who spoke about the Three-Tier System. Day 1 Breakout Sessions.MADD Victim Advocates Dani Simien and Kathy Hernandez during their breakout session on becoming advocates.  Amber Newby and Kathleen Armstrong Staas from the Blanco Coalition of Awareness, Prevention, and Treatment of Substance Abuse (CoAPT).Our friends from the RED Program with advocates Dani Simien and Kathy Hernandez. Day 2 Breakout Sessions.

Do you have Summit pictures to share? Be sure to post them on our Facebook page  or send them to us at tst@texansstandingtall.org!

 

 

Alcohol Delivery

Texans Standing Tall Takes on D.C.

Last month, staff from Texans Standing Tall had the opportunity to travel to Washington D.C. to help spread the message of prevention! TST’s own Sachin Kamble and Atalie Nitibhon spent a week meeting with elected officials and representatives of many substance use and mental health organizations.

Atalie and Sachin at the offices of National Council for Behavioral Health.

One highlight of the week was a visit to the offices of the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA). Texans Standing Tall had the opportunity to speak with SAMHSA experts about prevention’s role in addressing behavioral health. Kana Enomoto, the Acting Deputy Assistant Secretary of SAMHSA, reaffirmed the importance of preventing alcohol and tobacco abuse.

Dr. Priscilla Clark, Deputy Director of the Center for Mental Health Services, and Kana Enomoto, Acting Deputy Assistance Secretary, from SAMHSA field questions regarding the current behavioral health system in the United States.

During the “Texas Tuesday Coffee” session, Sachin was able to meet Sen. Ted Cruz. Sachin shared his personal journey with his struggles with excessive alcohol use. Sachin discussed what Texans Standing Tall does in the state and the importance of prevention. The senator was very receptive and acknowledged the wide-ranging impact of substance abuse on Texas citizens.

Senator Cruz chats it up with TST’s own Sachin.

Atalie and Sachin also visited Rep. Lloyd Doggett’s office, where they met with his Health Legislative Aide Hannah Vogel to discuss substance use disorders and prevention as public health issues.

Health Legislative Aide Hannah Vogel (pictured far left) speaks to a group of representatives from various behavioral health organizations in Texas.

Overall, the trip was a valuable experience. If TST wants to change attitudes and behaviors toward youth substance use, advocacy at local, statewide, and national levels is essential.

Alcohol Delivery

Update: Powdered Alcohol

Thanks to dedicated efforts from advocates across Texas, we came together and accomplished something important: we let policymakers know that powdered alcohol has no place in our state.

There’s still work left to do, and in the coming months, we’ll be calling on you to keep educating your family, friends, and elected officials about the importance of keeping this dangerous product off the shelves. But first, let’s look at what we were able to do when we worked together this session:

  • On February 28, TST brought together advocates from across the state for Advocacy Day at the Texas Capitol. After a morning of training, attendees visited their representatives’ offices to educate them on the dangers of powdered alcohol and ask them to ban the product.
  • In March, TST CEO Nicole Holt, along with coalition members from across the state, provided testimony on powdered alcohol before House and Senate committees. During the hearings, YLC member Andrea Marquez demonstrated how easy it would be for youth to conceal nearly 50 shots of alcohol in a makeup bag. See the video below for the same demonstration shared during TST’s Statewide Summit.
  • The Texas Tribune covered powdered alcohol and the committee hearings in a featured piece on their website.
  • TribTalk published op-eds about reasons for banning powdered alcohol from TST’s Sachin Kamble and YLC member Andrea Marquez.
  • Coalition members and other concerned citizens called and emailed their representatives to say that an outright ban of powdered alcohol is the safest path forward for our youth.
  • Powerful advocates and community leaders in Lufkin and College Station had editorials on banning powdered alcohol published in local papers.
  • Efforts to classify and regulate powdered alcohol as an alcoholic beverage died in the House and Senate.

And then this happened…

Towards the end of May, we saw that the label for Lt. Blender’s “Cheat-A-Rita” has been approved and it’s getting closer to the marketplace. Though we’ve made great strides, there are still businesses out there looking to make money by selling a dangerous product that poses a threat to the health and safety of our youth, even though there’s no demand for it.

Clearly, we have more work to do.

We will continue to monitor what’s happening with powdered alcohol in Texas and throughout the United States. Be sure to stay tuned and let us know how you want to be involved. Click the “Get Involved!” button below and let us know if you would like to:

  • Receive news and updates on powdered alcohol.
  • Contact your representatives about banning powdered alcohol.
  • Provide testimony on powdered alcohol during any interim hearings or the legislative session in 2019.
  • Write an op-ed or letter to the editor for the paper in your community.
  • Participate in a powdered alcohol workgroup.

Get Involved!

Thanks for your continued support and advocacy efforts!

85th_Leg_Blog11217

Tobacco 21: What It Is and What’s Happening in Texas

by: Christi Koenig Brisky, Esq.

The Tobacco21 movement has made its way to Texas after a whirlwind policy shift across the United States. In both the House and the Senate, lawmakers have filed bills that would prohibit the sale of cigarettes, e-cigarettes, and other tobacco products to anyone under the age of 21. If passed, the bills would 1) criminalize the possession of tobacco products to anyone under 21, and 2) charge anyone found guilty of selling to underage youth with a Class C Misdemeanor, which could result in a $500 fine. These bills have crossed partisan lines, with Republicans and Democrats co-authoring Tobacco21 bills in the Texas legislature.

Tobacco21 is a public health movement most accurately summarized by its social media hashtag: #raisetheage. Those in favor of raising the legal purchase age of tobacco 21 believe it would reduce the most commonly seen form of underage tobacco purchasing: the social purchase of tobacco for underage users by someone 18 or older. Approximately 86% of students report that they obtain their cigarettes from social sources, with research showing that 15-17 year olds obtain cigarettes through social sources 86% of the time and e-cigarettes through social sources 89% of the time.  The Institute of Medicine estimated that if the minimum legal age were increased to 21, it would reduce smoking initiation among 15-17 year olds by approximately 25%. Anecdotally, Needham, Massachusetts, the first city in the United States to increase the tobacco sales age to 21, saw tobacco use rates among high school students decrease by almost 50%, with frequent tobacco use decreasing by 62%.

The vast majority of states in the country have set the legal smoking age at 18. Four states (Alabama, Alaska, New Jersey, and Utah) have adopted a minimum legal smoking age of 19. Even more states have considered—and failed to pass—statutes increasing the legal smoking age, despite significant popular support across party lines.

Despite some pushback from both the tobacco industry and political operatives, this movement has made incredible legislative strides since 2014. Over the past two years, two states—California and Hawaii— and over two hundred cities and counties across the country have passed ordinances to raise the legal minimum age for sale of all tobacco and nicotine products from 18 to 21. This is not just a state issue; U.S. Senator Brian Schatz and nine co-sponsors introduced legislation to raise the age to 21 nationwide for purchase of any tobacco product, including cigarettes, cigars, chewing tobacco, and as of 2016, vaping products. Although it ultimately died in Committee, this attempt was an important milestone for the Tobacco21 movement.

Tobacco21 does not just affect 90% of smokers who started smoking by age 20; it also affects the overall public health of our country as a whole. The Institute of Medicine reported that by raising the age, it would reduce premature deaths by almost 223,000 and lung cancer deaths by 50,000. The conservative estimate is that Tobacco21 would also prevent 4.2 million years of life lost to smoking in youth alive today.

Tobacco doesn’t just cost us lives. Both individually and nationwide, smoking has a pretty hefty price tag. Nationwide, smoking costs each taxpaying household about $951 per year.  In Texas alone, it causes financial bleeding to the tune of about $17.1 billion in total annual health care expenditures caused by tobacco-related diseases. Secondhand smoke exposure is associated with an estimated $6.03 billion in annual health care expenditures, nationwide. That’s right—smoking costs you money even if you don’t actually smoke yourself. What’s more, for every one Texan who quits smoking, there is a five-year savings of $7,027 in medical costs and lost productivity.

These are issues that directly affect Texans, and we will continue to follow the Tobacco 21 movement in our state and across the country. In the meantime, we encourage you to register for our Summit on May 1 – 2, 2017 to learn more about this and other tobacco issues in Texas. Visit www.TexansStandingTall.org to register.