Tis the Season

‘Tis the Season!

‘Tis the season … to make sure we’re talking about alcohol with our kids

College students are home for the holidays. High schoolers are finding themselves in empty houses while parents are at work or doing last-minute holiday shopping. Adults are feeling celebratory.

It’s the most wonderful time of the year.

Unfortunately, it’s also one of the most dangerous times of the year.

Data overwhelmingly show that December means greater exposure to alcohol for our youth—and the myriad consequences that come with it, including assault, unplanned sexual activity, alcohol poisoning, and impaired driving. (According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, the average number of fatalities involving an alcohol-impaired driver rose 34% during the Christmas and New Year period alone.)

So while we’re gathered ‘round the fire with loved ones, what can we do to keep our kids and communities safer?

Set an example. A new report shows young people are very aware of how much their parents drink, and it affects their own relationship with alcohol. During the holidays, it’s important for our kids to see that we can celebrate without alcohol. If you do drink alcohol, don’t drive. Model riding with a sober driver.

Talk to your kids—and ask the tough questions. What are your kids doing while they’re home from college? Who are they spending time with? Talking to them about alcohol consumption and being clear about your expectations – underage drinking is dangerous, illegal, and unacceptable — is key. (Here are some great tips for how to talk to teens about alcohol. For example, don’t “lecture” and opt for open-ended questions.)

Share the data. Alcohol impairs judgment, and kids who drink are more likely to become involved in car crashes, be more sexually active, do worse in school, experience and/or cause physical violence, and abuse alcohol as adults.  You can share some other important facts about alcohol with your kids when the time is right.

Don’t drink and drive. Stay sober, or find a safe way home. It’s really that easy.

Don’t host or allow your child to attend an underage drinking party. It’s not safe and it’s illegal. It’s that simple.

We know delaying alcohol use as long as possible will decrease the chances our kids will develop problems associated with alcohol later in life. Setting an example, talking to them early, and sharing information can go a long way in making sure alcohol has no place in the lives of our children.

 

Tis the Season

Drinking Alcohol Raises Cancer Risk

Alcohol is a “definitive” risk factor for cancer, according to a statement released this month by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO). 

According to ASCO, minimizing excessive exposure of alcohol has important implications for cancer prevention. In its statement, ASCO noted that alcohol consumption is causally associated with oropharyngeal (throat) and laryngeal (voicebox) cancer, esophageal cancer, liver cancer, breast cancer, and colon cancer. However, alcohol may also be a risk factor for other cancers, including pancreatic and stomach cancers.

Researchers looked at several studies that found a strong correlation between alcohol and cancer.  They concluded that 3.5% of all cancer-related deaths were due to alcohol consumption.  They further concluded that in 2012, 5.5% of new cancer occurrences and 5.8% of all cancer deaths worldwide were attributable to alcohol consumption.

“The importance of alcohol drinking as a contributing factor to the overall cancer burden is often underappreciated,” the organization said in its statement. “Associations between alcohol drinking and cancer risk have been observed consistently regardless of the specific type of alcoholic beverages.”

Another recent study shows that teens aged 14-17 are less likely to drink if they know about the link between alcohol and cancer. Unfortunately, most aren’t actually aware of the connection. To help create healthier, safter communities, Texans Standing Tall believes its especially important to share this new research so young people gain a better understanding of the consequences of alcohol consumption.

Tis the Season

“Fraternities must change.”

The national fraternity Sigma Phi Epsilon took the bold initiative this month of announcing a ban on alcohol and other substances at all of its 215 chapters.

“Sigma Phi Epsilon and our peers have unfortunately earned a reputation for being organizations that promote alcohol consumption, misogyny and violence,” CEO Brian Warren said. “For SigEp, there can be no more discussion about maintaining that status quo. Fraternities must change.”

According to the Institute of Alcohol Studies, alcohol use is the leading cause of death, disease, and disability worldwide for people aged 15-49. This is a serious public health issue that deserves our attention.

Over the last few weeks, many universities have taken steps to combat the dangerous, and sometimes deadly, alcohol-related behaviors associated with Greek life.  The most recent—and closest to home—is the suspension of all Greek activity at Texas State University after the death of a 20-year-old pledge to a fraternity.

Texans Standing Tall is encouraged by the movement within the Greek community to work to end the normalization of alcohol for teenagers and young college students. Rather than supporting a narrative that claims alcohol use is “just a part of college life,” it’s important to remind students that college is a time for them to learn, grow, and develop skills for creating a bright and healthy future – that is the college experience we want them to strive for.

Tis the Season

Engage for Community Change: New Website

In 2016, Texans Standing Tall received a grant from the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) to conduct a statewide assessment to help identify potential areas of collaboration between the traffic safety community and substance use prevention coalitions, and to develop an interactive tool to help connect coalitions and traffic safety experts.

This month, after conducting interviews with more than 50 prevention coalition leaders and traffic safety experts, analyzing findings, and collaborating to build an interactive web site, Texans Standing Tall launched Engage for Community Change.

On the website, people looking to connect with coalitions can search for one another by location, community type, or areas of focus. The goal is to help coalitions and communities leverage scarce resources for addressing problems in their communities that stem from underage alcohol and other substance abuse.

Coalitions have been integral to the passage of city social host ordinances that hold people accountable for underage drinking parties that occur in their homes or on their property. Texas leads the nation in the number of drunk driving crashes. Coalitions can have a potentially huge impact on reducing impaired driving, and we know that this tool can serve to assist businesses, agencies, nonprofits, and concerned citizens in making our communities safer.

Through the Engage for Community Change project, Texans Standing Tall hopes to help increase collaboration between coalitions and traffic safety experts in the state of Texas. If you have any questions or want your organization to be included in the project, please contact Kaleigh Becker, Research & Program Specialist, via email at kbecker@texansstandingtall.org or at 512-442-7501.

Tis the Season

Alcohol vs. Athletes

Research indicates that student athletes are a population that is at risk for alcohol use—81 percent of college student-athletes used alcohol in the past year, and 62 percent used alcohol in the past month (NCAA, 2014). When the vast majority of student-athletes are using alcohol on a regular basis, we have a problem.

Some factors that contribute to student-athlete alcohol use include stress from the dual roles that they play on campus and the increased scrutiny they receive, overexposure to social settings that promote alcohol use, and challenges related to having less contact with their central support networks. All students, including athletes, also tend to overestimate the alcohol use of their peers and underestimate their own alcohol use, which contributes to a drinking culture on campus.

In addition to the negative consequences of drinking that can affect all students, such as unplanned sexual activity, combination drug use, and binge drinking, college student-athletes have other reasons to avoid using alcohol.

When talking about athletes specifically, there are a number of reasons alcohol use is concerning. In addition to concerns about physical and mental well-being of the students, alcohol hinders an athlete’s performance.

Alcohol Damages the Heart. Intense exercise increases your heart rate. Drinking alcohol even two days before exercising causes additional stress on the heart and can result in unusual heart rhythms (Drink Aware, 2014). 

Alcohol Harms Muscle Growth. Alcohol use cancels out gains from a workout. Chronic alcohol use can damage long-term performance by causing muscle damage, muscle loss, and muscle weakness; even short-term alcohol use can impede muscle growth. This muscle loss and weakness is known as myopathy. Myopathy can affect all muscles – such as those in your arms, legs, and heart – in a way that can harm athletic abilities (University Health Center, 2014).

Exercising With a Hangover Decreases Performance. When exercising, the body must continuously remove lactic acid. After drinking, a person’s liver is working hardest to rid the body of the toxic by-products of alcohol and cannot remove the lactic acid. This causes a feeling of fatigue, which lowers athletic performance (Drink Aware, 2014).

Alcohol Causes Dehydration. Alcohol is a diuretic, meaning it makes the kidneys produce more urine and can cause the athlete’s body to become dehydrated. Staying hydrated helps blood flow so it can carry oxygen and nutrients to the muscles (Drink Aware, 2014). When dehydrated, an athlete may experience low energy, low endurance, cramps, muscle pulls, muscle strains, and muscle loss. Full recovery from dehydration can take up to a week (UC San Diego Intercollegiate Athletics).                                                                                                                                             

Alcohol Hurts Athletic Performance. Alcohol is linked with a loss of balance, reaction time, memory, and accuracy of fine motor skills (Vella & Cameron-Smith, 2010). Drinking alcohol leads to slower running and cycling times, weakens the heart’s ability to pump, impairs temperature regulation, decreases grip strength and jump height, lowers stamina, and reduces strength and power (Kozir & American College of Sports Medicine).

For college student-athletes, avoiding dangerous alcohol use can benefit their performance in and out of the classroom. Through sensible alcohol policies and educational campaigns that challenge students’ misperceptions, colleges can help prevent alcohol use among student-athletes.

For more information, check out our Athletes vs. Alcohol handout here.

 

Tis the Season

New Routines, New Opportunities for Underage Alcohol Use

The start of the school year is an exciting time! Students have the opportunity to try new activities, make new friends, and experience new social situations. However, these positive changes can also create conditions like social and academic pressures that leave young people especially vulnerable to dangerous alcohol use and abuse. Parents taking steps to prevent underage alcohol use and abuse is essential to promoting the safety of their children.

The majority of underage drinking takes place in social settings, such as at home and at parties. Even if parents are at home, underage drinking that occurs at parties can have many negative consequences, including violence and assaults, unplanned sexual activity, combination drug use, property damage and vandalism, and binge drinking and alcohol poisoning. Preventing underage social access to alcohol can help reduce these negative consequences.

Parents play a critical role in preventing underage drinking. If parents do not provide a space for underage drinking to occur, young people are significantly less likely to drink. Parents can help change attitudes and expectations that underage drinking is just a fact of life in their community by providing social activities that are alcohol-free and speaking with other parents about the consequences of underage drinking at parties, with or without supervision. Fostering an environment where underage drinking is not viewed as an inevitable rite of passage can help prevent many of the destructive consequences of underage social access to alcohol.

The beginning of the school year is fun and exciting. However, the changes in environment, friends, and school stressors can lead to unhealthy behavior. Parents should have a plan of action to help their kids stay out of trouble when it comes to underage drinking and alcohol abuse. When parents are undeniably clear with their children that are expected to obey the law and not drink underage, their children more often listen to them over their peers. Reducing youth access to alcohol at house parties and in other social situations can keep them safe and healthy – not just as kids, but well into adulthood.

Tis the Season

Happy Independence Day!

 

This July 4th, we want to help make sure you have a healthy, safe, and FUN holiday! Here are a few reminders to make this holiday weekend a great one:

  • July 4th is one of the most dangerous times of the year on the roads, largely due to drunk driving crashes. In the U.S., nearly 400 people are killed in traffic crashes every year during the holiday; 41% of those crashes involve an impaired driver. With AAA estimating a record number of travelers will be headed out this Fourth of July weekend, it’s especially important to exercise caution when you take to the roads. Be careful out there and check out our “Tips for Safe Travel During the Holiday Weekend” below!
  • If you’re on a boat this 4th, remember that boating and alcohol don’t mix. In addition to impairing the driver’s ability to make good judgements, alcohol also affects passengers’ ability to respond in the case of an emergency. If you’re headed out on the water this weekend, the American Boating Association has some great safety tips you can read about here. 
  • Fireworks are awesome, but they can be dangerous. Make sure you have a water supply close by, and don’t attempt to relight a dud.
  • Pets do not love fireworks as much as their owners do. In fact, one in five pets goes missing after being scared by loud noises, so make sure that pets are in a safe, secure, and quiet place. And, for more ways to keep your four-legged friends safe, check out this list from the ASPCA.
  • Always supervise a barbecue grill when it is in use.
  • If you’re outside, remember to drink plenty of water and reapply sunscreen often.
  • Have fun!

Tis the Season

Update: Powdered Alcohol

Thanks to dedicated efforts from advocates across Texas, we came together and accomplished something important: we let policymakers know that powdered alcohol has no place in our state.

There’s still work left to do, and in the coming months, we’ll be calling on you to keep educating your family, friends, and elected officials about the importance of keeping this dangerous product off the shelves. But first, let’s look at what we were able to do when we worked together this session:

  • On February 28, TST brought together advocates from across the state for Advocacy Day at the Texas Capitol. After a morning of training, attendees visited their representatives’ offices to educate them on the dangers of powdered alcohol and ask them to ban the product.
  • In March, TST CEO Nicole Holt, along with coalition members from across the state, provided testimony on powdered alcohol before House and Senate committees. During the hearings, YLC member Andrea Marquez demonstrated how easy it would be for youth to conceal nearly 50 shots of alcohol in a makeup bag. See the video below for the same demonstration shared during TST’s Statewide Summit.
  • The Texas Tribune covered powdered alcohol and the committee hearings in a featured piece on their website.
  • TribTalk published op-eds about reasons for banning powdered alcohol from TST’s Sachin Kamble and YLC member Andrea Marquez.
  • Coalition members and other concerned citizens called and emailed their representatives to say that an outright ban of powdered alcohol is the safest path forward for our youth.
  • Powerful advocates and community leaders in Lufkin and College Station had editorials on banning powdered alcohol published in local papers.
  • Efforts to classify and regulate powdered alcohol as an alcoholic beverage died in the House and Senate.

And then this happened…

Towards the end of May, we saw that the label for Lt. Blender’s “Cheat-A-Rita” has been approved and it’s getting closer to the marketplace. Though we’ve made great strides, there are still businesses out there looking to make money by selling a dangerous product that poses a threat to the health and safety of our youth, even though there’s no demand for it.

Clearly, we have more work to do.

We will continue to monitor what’s happening with powdered alcohol in Texas and throughout the United States. Be sure to stay tuned and let us know how you want to be involved. Click the “Get Involved!” button below and let us know if you would like to:

  • Receive news and updates on powdered alcohol.
  • Contact your representatives about banning powdered alcohol.
  • Provide testimony on powdered alcohol during any interim hearings or the legislative session in 2019.
  • Write an op-ed or letter to the editor for the paper in your community.
  • Participate in a powdered alcohol workgroup.

Get Involved!

Thanks for your continued support and advocacy efforts!

Tis the Season

Bud Light Raises Spuds MacKenzie From the Dead in Super Bowl LI Commercial

By Kazia Conway

I was watching Super Bowl LI with my family on Feb. 4, along with 100 million people who probably have families like mine that include young children.

Let’s establish my family. My five-year-old daughter couldn’t have cared less about the game. Mommy likes the Patriots. Daddy is a Cowboys fan. Kennedy just likes to be included in the enthusiasm when we jump off the couch screaming in disbelief or in extreme praise of a well-executed play.

Courtesy Google Commons

But on Sunday night, my daughter’s lack of interest in the television took a turn when she looked up and saw the late Spuds MacKenzie revived through a ghostly computer-generated image on our screen for a Bud Light commercial. Kennedy opened her mouth and said, “Aaaaawwwww! He’s so cute.” Believe me, if I didn’t work in the prevention field I wouldn’t have noticed the ploy that was executed by none other than Anheuser-Busch.

Spuds MacKenzie “super party animal” ads rolled out the year (literally the Sunday before) I was born during the Super Bowl in 1987. I didn’t know anything about him. But my husband, who was five at the time – the same age my daughter is now – immediately said, “Hey, that’s Spuds MacKenzie! He was a big deal when daddy was a kid. He died in the late 90s.”

I immediately started researching Spuds MacKenzie for a little background information. I didn’t have to look far; one of the first things that comes up when you search “Spuds MacKenzie” is a bundle of old commercials with the adorable Spuds. He is a lovable Bull Terrier with a brown spot over his left eye. The New York Times reported in 1989 that Spuds “increased sales of Bud Light beer by 20 percent between 1987 and 1988.”

Nationally, Bud Light is the most consumed alcoholic beverage by underage drinkers. The Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth reports that “every day in the US, more than 4,750 kids under the age of 16 have their first full drink of alcohol.” In Texas, 18 percent of students report having their first full drink of alcohol before the age of 13.

The alcohol industry has set a voluntary standard saying it will not advertise in spaces where more than 30% of the viewing audience is under the legal drinking age of 21. However, the reaction to Spuds MacKenzie from both my five-year-old daughter and my husband’s five-year-old self say that the alcohol industry’s voluntary self-regulation isn’t exactly working.

Spuds’ time in the spotlight was short lived because of efforts spearheaded by politicians and Mothers Against Drunk Driving. Eventually, schools across the nation began banning clothing that featured the adorable pup.

I was two when Bud Light officially retired its famous canine in 1989, and I somehow managed to live my entire life without knowing anything about this controversial cultural icon. Spuds’ impact on “cool” may have skipped a generation of millennials, but our kids are now being exposed.

Alcohol remains the most-used substance by Texas youth. I am armed to handle alcohol in a way that most parents aren’t because I work in prevention. I have read and written about the importance of discussing the negative consequences, health risks, and zero-tolerance laws around alcohol. I have read and written about the importance of leading by example. I have also read and written about the importance of making sure my daughter has a very clear understanding that her parents will not tolerate alcohol, tobacco, or drug use of any kind in or out of our presence. I recognize the parenting privilege I have and that there are millions of other families with young children who are not aware of the impact alcohol advertising has on them.

They say that money is power. Well, the alcohol industry spends $4 billion a year on advertising –how’s that for power? Because of this, it is important that parents remember there is power in the tongue. Talking to the youth in your life about the risks of alcohol is free. Your children aren’t too young to see these advertisements, so they’re not too young to begin the conversation.

We’re interested in hearing your thoughts on Bud Light reviving Spuds MacKenzie and what watching the “Big Game” with your children was like this year. Share your experience in the comments.