November 2016 Newsletter

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November 2016 Newsletter

In This Issue

Welcome Our New YLC Members
Surgeon General's Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health
Study Reveals Psychological Disorders Associated with Early Alcohol Use

YOUTH LEADERSHIP COUNCIL
A Texas-Sized Welcome to Our New YLC Members

The Youth Leadership Council held is Fall training on the weekend of Nov. 18-20. The YLC welcomed back 10 returning members and 9 new members.
The Youth Leadership Council held is Fall training on the weekend of Nov. 18-20. The YLC welcomed back 10 returning members and 9 new members.

New Members

Isabel, 17
Isabel, 17

Isabel Dunkelberger
Isabel is a senior at Timber Creek High School. She joined the YLC because she wants to make a substantial change in the prevention of alcohol among youth.

Kadie, 17
Kadie, 17

Kadie Beth Wisener
Kadie is a senior at Crimson Christian Academy. Kadie joined the YLC in hopes of learning more about alcohol prevention and how to educate people in her community about the topic.

 

Jack, 17
Jack, 17

Jack McMillan
Jack is a junior at Bendrook Middle High School and a first year YLC member. Jack joined the YLC because he wants to assist in preventing the ongoing problem of underage alcohol and drug use.

Marlene, 18
Marlene, 18

Marlene Silva
Marlene is a senior from Franklin High School. Marlene heard about the YLC from a teacher and decided to join to make an impact and change in her community.

 

Karla, 18
Karla, 18

Karla Rodriguez
Karla is a senior at Kilgore High School. This is her first year in the YLC and she hope to gain knowledge and experience from the YLC while also learning about the issues and using the information she learns to make an impact.

Myrka, 17
Myrka, 17

Myrka Lila
Myrka is a senior from Lufkin High School. She hopes to become an activist in her community and help decrease underage alcohol consumption.

 

Ashton, 18
Ashton, 18

Ashton Baker
Ashton is a senior at Ingleside High School. She heard about the YLC from a returning member and decided to join because she is interested in making a change.

Nikolai, 17
Nikolai, 17

Nikolai Petty
Nikolai is a senior at Chapin High School. He joined the YLC because he plans to make an impact on his peers and help keep them away from alcohol.

McKenzi, 17
McKenzi, 17

McKenzi Crager
McKenzi is a senior at Lufkin High School. She joined the YLC to help hone her speaking skills and become an active participant to change her community.

Returning Members

Taryn, 20
Taryn, 20

Taryn Quinn
This is Taryn's sixth and final year in the YLC. She is a senior at Art Institute of Austin. Taryn hopes to use the knowledge she's gained from the YLC to influence stake holders and increase the excise tax by educating and encouraging her community to be active members of the community.

 

Carlos, 18
Carlos, 18

Carlos Vela
Carlos has been on the YLC for two years. He is a senior at Ingleside High School and hopes his work in the YLC will eventually lead to policy changes happening in his town, state, and nation.

AJ, 19
AJ, 19

Anthony "AJ" Cortez
AJ is in his fourth year in the YLC. He is a sophomore at Our Lady of the Lake University. He hopes to continue to gain more leadership traits and expand his knowledge on underage drinking.

 

Kayla, 18
Kayla, 18

Kayla Gardner
Kayla is a freshman at Midwestern State University. This is Kayla's second year in the YLC. She hopes to become an advocate in the state of Texas who can really make a difference in the health and safety of her peers.

Kendrion, 18
Kayla, 18

Kendrion Ferrell
Kendrion is a freshman at Texas A&M. He has been in the YLC for two years and wants to take all the information that he has learned and spread the information to the schools in his county. He wants to pursue a career in medicine.

 

Andrea, 16
Andrea, 16

Andrea Marquez
Andrea is a junior at Loretto Academy High School. She has been in the YLC for two years. She hopes to become more informed on underage alcohol consumption and how she can make a difference in her community.

Jesus, 19
Jesus, 19

Jesus Cabrales
Jesus is a sophomore at University of Texas El Paso (UTEP). He has been on the YLC for three years. He hopes to continues to gain as much knowledge as possible and wants to make sure that everyone in his community knows what the YLC is.

 

Ahmaris, 17
Ahmaris, 17

Ahmaris Lechuga
Ahmaris is a senior at Jefferson High School. She has been on the YLC for two years and hopes to gain enough knowledge and skills that she can make a change in her community and the state.

Joey, 17
Joey, 17

Joseph "Joey" Smith
Joey is a senior at Ingleside High School. This is Joey's second year in the YLC. He hopes to use his experience to make a difference and plans to pass a social host ordinance.

 

 Nathaniel, 19
Nathaniel, 19

Nathaniel Fomby
Nathaniel is a sophomore at Concordia University. Nathaniel is a third year YLC member and joined the YLC because he wanted to expand his knowledge on policy and the effects of alcohol.

Surgeon General Releases Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health

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The Surgeon General released a 2016 report on "Facing Addiction in America."

The Surgeon General's Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Healthreleased a new report on "Facing Addiction in America" on Nov. 18. The Report reiterates the research on excessive drinking and evidence-based public health intervention. It also details the methods for preventing excessive drinking and the related harms and focuses on addiction.

The Report supports increasing alcohol excise taxes, a policy that Texans Standing Tall has been educating on and advocating for over the last 10 years. It also backs the Texas-specific statistics found in our report The Effects of Alcohol Excise Tax Increases on Public Health and Safety in Texas.

The Surgeon General's Report states that policies designed to "increase the costs of alcohol have immediate, positive benefits in reducing drinking and binge drinking, as well as the resulting harms from alcohol misuse, such as motor vehicle crashes and fatalities."

In Texas, a 10-cent increase in the alcohol excise tax will prevent 46,959 youth from underage drinking and 27,393 from binge drinking. The 10-cent increase will also save 112 lives from alcohol-related traffic crashes.

The Report states that binge drinking accounts for most of the alcohol-related harms in the United States. Twenty-one percent of Texas youth have binge drank alcohol. A 10-cent increase in Texas will reduce alcohol liver disease, rape, robbery, violent behavior towards children, sexually transmitted disease, and suicide rates. It would also lead to 66 less babies being born with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.

The view the full Surgeon General's Report on Alcohol, Drugs, and Health, click here.

 

 

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New Study Reveals Psychological Disorders Associated with Early Alcohol Use

Co-occurring disorders have been a trending topic on social media and popular news outlets since rapper Kid Cudi released new music, along with announcing he will be going into rehab for depression and drug abuse.

A timely study from the Spanish National Drug Plan has shown that there is an increased risk for psychological disorders associated with alcohol consumption onset between 11 and 13 years old.  The study showed that the most common symptoms of the more than 3,696 adolescents who participated in the study were bodily discomfort, hostility, and aggression.

Scientists asked 18-year-old participants who responded to indicate what age they began drinking and to identify any of the following nine symptoms that they had experienced: anxiety, depression, obsession-compulsion, phobia, hostility, paranoid ideation, interpersonal sensitivity, psychoticism and somatization. The responses indicated that psychological discomforts were increased when alcohol consumption started between the ages 11 and 13 as compared to those who started later in life.

The most common symptoms were hostility and aggression, leading to a higher likelihood of expressing ideas or violent behavior others and themselves.

Women showed more signs of anxiety and depression and recorded responses that may point to a greater vulnerability of adolescent women to alcohol effects. On the other hand, the study found that men showed a certain degree of psychoticism.

Since hiring our Peer Policy Fellow through our partnership with the Hogg Foundation, Texans Standing Tall has been looking at co-occurring disorders through a prevention lens. In other words, how can we reach at-risk youth before alcohol and other drugs do?

 

 

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November is Lung Cancer Awareness Month

9d4604d5-5549-4440-b6c2-3ed2d80a9dfaEvery year on the third Thursday of November, smokers across the nation take part in the American Cancer Society's Great American Smokeout. Coupled with the fact that November is lung cancer awareness month, this is a great time to discuss the dangers of smoking.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 9 out of 10 adult smokers started before the age of 18, and nearly all started by age 26. The report went on to estimate that nearly 75 percent of high school smokers would go on to become adult smokers, even if they intended to quit.

There are  498,000 youth  in Texas under the age of 18 who will prematurely die from smoking.

The tobacco industry is coming up with new and inventive ways to bring youth into the fold of traditional cigarettes. More youth are using e-cigarettes than are using traditional cigarettes. A study out of the University of Hawaii in Honolulu found that teens who use e-cigarettes are more likely to try and use traditional cigarettes.

Nicotine can still be found in e-cigarettes and the flavors often associated with electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) are in a class of chemicals called aldehydes, known as respiratory irritants, which are not meant to be inhaled.

Texans Standing Tall wants your help in creating a smoke-free generation. By advocating for evidence-based strategies, we are working toward a generation where all tobacco products are a thing of the past. Contact TST for more information about making your community healthy, safe, and smoke-free.

 

 

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Tell us your story!

Do you have a story about how tobacco and alcohol have affected your life or someone you know? Maybe you were the catalyst behind them making a change. Email tst@texansstandingtall.org to make your story known!

 

 

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Thank you for Standing Tall with us!logo_200

 

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Support us while you shop this holiday season!

 

 

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Stand Tall with us and contribute to a healthier and safer Texas!

Contact Us

Learn how to get involved by visiting our web site:

www.TexansStandingTall.org

Send us an email:

TST@TexansStandingTall.org

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