May 2015 Newsletter

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

May 2015 Newsletter

COALITION NEWS and UPDATES

 

articipating in LifeSteps Community Forum were (L to R) Julie Stevens, executive director of LifeSteps; Mindy Carroll, director of Education and Prevention, Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission; Sharesa Y. Alexander, prosecutor, member of Texas Young Lawyers Association, and David Dady, Senior Account Executive, Dady Insurance Agency.
articipating in LifeSteps Community Forum were (L to R) Julie Stevens, executive director of LifeSteps; Mindy Carroll, director of Education and Prevention, Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission; Sharesa Y. Alexander, prosecutor, member of Texas Young Lawyers Association, and David Dady, Senior Account Executive, Dady Insurance Agency.

Williamson County LifeSteps
Introduces New Drug Impact Index during community forum

The Williamson County LifeSteps Council on Alcohol and Drugs recently held a community forum on the impact of Social Hosting liability/laws.
 
Experts from the Judicial and enforcement side joined 30-40 participants to discuss what constitutes social access, as well as the ramifications, both legal and social, that arise from underage drinking.
 
Julie Stevens, executive director
of LifeSteps, used the opportunity of the forum to introduce their "Drug Impact Index" which collected data from various sources to give a snapshot look of substance abuse in Williamson County.
 
The index looked at such indicators as youth and adult arrests for alcohol-related violations in Williamson County, youth who reported illicit substance abuse in Williamson County and Texas, as well as alcohol-impaired driving deaths in the county.
 
"The Drug Impact Index marks  
a significant step forward in promoting the community use of data for collective action," said Ms. Stevens. "The intent of the Index is to begin a conversation with elected officials, school districts, parents and treatment providers about the pervasiveness of substance abuse in Williamson County."
 
Among the panelists was Mindy Carroll, director of Education and Prevention of the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC). One of the situations discussed were parties where a "cover charge" might be collected from party attendees. Ms. Carroll pointed out that  when alcoholic beverages are provided without a TABC permit, there cannot be any expectation of receiving money. The organization or servers cannot ask for a "donation" or "tip," and that the providers of the alcohol could be charged with "operating without a license."

 

4ad0a9ae-3067-458b-85db-779121eaab3a

San Antonio Council on Drug and Alcohol Abuse Hosts Control Party Dispersal Training

Law enforcement receives a noise disturbance call in a neighborhood. Two officers check out the report and find more than 60 youth participating in what appears to be a party involving alcohol.
 
That was the scenario at a recent Control Party Dispersal training held at the San Antonio Police Academy. The training, provided through a grant from the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT), was facilitated by the San Antonio Council on Drug and Alcohol Abuse (SACADA) and Texans Standing Tall (TST).
 
Teen parties remain as one of the   highest-risk settings for youth alcohol abuse where lack of adult supervision often leads to serious problems, including impaired driving, vandalism, sexual assault and alcohol poisoning. Applying control party dispersal techniques is a proactive approach to minimize potential damage by making sure that party attendees get home under parental or guardian supervision, while also identifying and holding responsible those who supplied the alcohol.
 
Fourteen officers from the Vice Division of the San Antonio Police Department took part in the training on May 19. Joel Moreno, retired Director of Field Operations for the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC), conducted the training, which consisted of two hours of classroom instruction followed by the demonstration portion with youth.
 
Sixty-seven youth, coming from area Police Explorer groups as well as the youth arm of SACADA, Helping Youth Prevention through Entertainment (HYPE), performed a party scene that gave the officers a feel for handling a chaotic situation.
 
"This was a very realistic demonstration," remarked one undercover vice officer. "We can often run into situations where we are outnumbered, and this training spotlighted techniques to calmly, but forcefully take control."
 
The youth who participated also found the training educational. "They really learned a lot," said Boyd Baxter, Coalition Coordinator. "For the police explorers, they got some insight as to how police work unfolds on the street, and they as well as our HYPE youth also got an understanding of how to avoid such parties in the first place."

 

Contribute to the success of the YLC.

DN2Button-OrangeSmall

Contact Us

Learn how to get involved by visiting our web site:

www.TexansStandingTall.org

Send us an email:

TST@TexansStandingTall.org

btn_fbk_160_a

btn_twit_160
@TXStandingTall
#EngageTST

 

jmml_1a

Texas 84th Legislative Actions

2e701c1a-48a1-46fa-96ff-b5c16f53a8a1The 84th session of the Texas Legislature ended Monday, June 1, 2015. Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) legislation scored a victory while tobacco funding was maintained. A recap of the 84th Legislative session as it relates to alcohol, tobacco and substance abuse is listed below.
 
Alcohol Related
Alcohol Awareness Program (HB 642) -- This bill requires that a minor under the age of 18 convicted of an alcohol-related offense or possession of a controlled substance such as marijuana must attend an alcohol awareness program or a drug education program as a condition of their community service. Read the bill here.
Actions: Bill passed through both chambers of the
legislature and was sent to the Governor for his signature.
 
Texas Alcohol Beverage Commission (HB 688) -- This bill would increase appointments to the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission (TABC) from three to five members.
Read the bill here.
Actions: Bill was reported favorably out of the House
Licensing and Administrative Procedures Committee, never reaching the floor for a vote effectively killing the bill.
 
Alcoholic Beverage to a Minor (HB 770) -- The offense of providing alcohol to a minor would be a state jail felony if it is shown at the trial of the offense that the minor who, as a result of the consumption of the alcoholic beverage, caused another person to suffer serious bodily injury or death. Read the bill here.
Actions: Bill was reported favorably out of the House
Licensing and Administrative Procedures Committee, never reaching the floor for a vote effectively killing the bill.
 
Powered Alcohol (HB 1018) -- Amends the Alcoholic Beverage Code to expand the definition of "illicit beverage" to include powered alcohol. The bill expands the prohibition against manufacturing, importing, selling or possessing for the purpose of sale of an alcoholic beverage made from certain materials to include serving an alcoholic beverage made from such materials and adds powered alcohol,
whether alone or reconstituted, to the list of materials to
which that prohibition applies. Read the bill here.
Actions: Bill reached the House floor, where after two
readings it was postponed from further action effectively killing the bill.
 
Train and Plane Excise Tax Repeal (HB 1905) -- Upon the bill's effective date, airlines and passenger trains serving alcoholic beverages would continue to be required to hold a permit issued by the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission but they no longer would pay the excise tax on the beverage service. Read the bill here.
Actions: The bill was sent to a House/Senate Conference
Committee to work out the differences with the versions of the bill from both chambers and was sent to the Governor for his signature.
 
Ignition Interlock Device (HB 2246) -- This bill amends various codes to require a defendant whose license is suspended for certain alcohol related offenses obtain and use an ignition interlock device if the defendant applies for and receives an occupational driver's license. Read the bill here.
Actions: Bill passed both chambers of the legislature
and was sent to the Governor for his signature.
 
Juvenile Case Manager Fund (HB 2945) -- Current law restricts the uses for which a juvenile case manager fund may be used to finance the salary, benefits, training, travel expenses, office supplies, and other necessary expenses relating to the position of a juvenile case manager. While cities and counties currently use the majority of money in such a fund in accordance with the law, a fund balance often remains after the restricted expenditures are paid. This bill allows remaining funds to be used on programs and services
that align with the overall mission of a juvenile case manager, which includes resolving substance abuse issues and preventing recidivism.
Read the bill here.
Actions: The bill has passed both chambers of the
legislature and was sent to the Governor for his signature.
 
Tobacco Related
Workplace Tobacco (SB 87) -- The proposal sought to ban smoking in the majority of workplaces and public places with a few exceptions including cigar bars and retail tobacco shops. Read the bill here.
Actions: The bill was referred to the Senate Committee on Health and Human Services, and never received a hearing effectively killing the bill.
 
Vapor and Tobacco Products on School Property
(SB 96) Amends the Education Code to add smoking, using, and student possession of e-cigarettes at a school-related or school-sanctioned activity on or off school property to conduct a school board of trustees is required to
prohibit. Read the bill here.
Actions: The bill passed through the Senate, was sent
to the House, where it was reported out of the House Committee on Education effectively killing the bill.
 
Distribution of Cigarettes, Vapor Products and Tobacco Products (SB 97) -- Amends the Health and Safety Code to include e-cigarettes among the products to which provisions regulating the sale and distribution of cigarettes and tobacco products apply, including treating vapor products
(e-cigarettes) in the same manner as cigarettes as they
relate to distribution, advertising, use by minors, prevention of use by minors, delivery, sales, and use in public places.
Read the bill here.
Actions: Bill passed both chambers of the legislature
and was sent to the Governor for his signature.

Prohibiting Tobacco in Car while Child Present
(HB 461) -- The proposed Law prohibits smoking any tobacco product in a passenger vehicle where a child is young enough to be secured in a child passenger safety seat system. The offense is a Class C misdemeanor. Read the bill
here.
Actions: The bill was reported out of the House Committee on Criminal Jurisprudence, was left pending in Calendars effectively killing the bill.
 
Substance Related
Medical Assistance for Overdose (HB 225) -- Allows as a defense to prosecution if the person was the first to request emergency medical assistance for a possible overdose by another person, and if that person stayed on the scene until medical assistance arrived and cooperated with EMS. Read the bill here.
Actions: Passed through both the House and Senate
and was sent to the Governor for his signature.
 
Medical Marijuana Use (HB 837) -- This bill would allow for the legal possession of marijuana if prescribed by a physician for the amelioration of the symptoms or effects of a bona fide medical conditions. Read the bill here.
Actions: The bill was referred to the House Committee
on Public Health, and was left pending in committee effectively killing the bill.
 
Monday June 1, 2015 was the final day of the regular session of the legislature. Sunday June 21, 2015 is the final day that the Governor can either sign or veto a bill passed during the regular session. Should the Governor neither sign nor veto a bill, it will become law either on the specific effective date specified or on the 91st day following the end of the regular session, Monday August 31, 2015.

 

spacer_org5

Nation's Leading Health Organizations Go to the Top for Tobacco Rules Finalization

Thirty-one leading public health and medical organizations recently urged President Obama to finalize rules covering all tobacco products, including electronic cigarettes, cigars and hookah.
 
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) currently regulates cigarettes, smokeless tobacco and               roll-your-own tobacco and can extend its jurisdiction to all other tobacco products under a 2009 law, the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act. The FDA announced its intentions to regulate all tobacco products in April of 2011, and issued a proposed rule in April of 2014. However, the FDA has not set a firm date to put the rule into effect.
 
Included among the health organizations who signed the letter to President Obama were: The American Heart Association, Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the Cancer Action Network, and the American Cancer Society.
 
According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since the FDA first proposed the new rules to cover all tobacco products, electronic cigarette and cigar use by youth has risen.
 
Electronic cigarette use has risen from 4.5 percent to 13.4 percent among high school students and from 1.1 percent to 3.9 percent among middle school students. The organization has also reported that there were 2.4 million youth electronic cigarette users in 2014.
 
Cigar use among high school boys remains a concern. They smoke cigars at about the same rate as cigarettes - 10.6% for cigarette use and 10.8% for cigar use. Cigars are the most commonly used tobacco product among African-American high school students, who smoke cigars at nearly twice the rate of cigarettes.

 

spacer_org5

Thank you for Standing Tall with us!logo_200

68990466-d7c6-4ddc-81f7-091d775f3bb4

BOOK
YOUR
HOTEL
NOW!

2015 Statewide Summit
SEPTEMBER 2-3, 2015

at Seton Healthcare Family Administrative Offices
St. Vincent de Paul Auditorium - 1st Floor
1345 Philomena St., Austin TX

A first-come-first-served block of rooms have been reserved at:
Holiday Inn Midtown, 6000 Middle Fiskville Rd., Austin TX 78752

Room Rates Per Night: Single or Double Occupancy:
$126 + 15% (state hotel tax 6%; city occupancy tax 9%)

To make a reservation: 512-451-5757 or 888-300-6273
Refer to group code: "Texans Standing Tall" or "TST"
http://www.ihg.com/holidayinn/hotels/us/en/austin/ausmf/hoteldetail

Expires: Group Lodging Rate Expires August 11, 2015

Facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail